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Deathmatch Manifesto


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The Deathmatch Manifesto is a fascinating book for a multitude of reasons. Published in 1997, really the dawn of the internet era for many home computer users, it's the first book of its kind to really dig in to the strategies used by gamers for fragging one another instead of the monsters. While competing against other human players itself went all the way back to the likes ofTennis For Two, Pong, and Space War, the concept of the "deathmatch" as it pertained to 3D gaming was in its relative infancy. Popularized by Doom, expanded on by Duke Nukem 3D, and levelled up by the release of Quake, there was a massive, untapped audience for this kind of thing, and Sybex sought to fill this void by publishing a guide not to beating the likes of those games, but rather beating the likes of those who had already beaten those games and were now looking for fresh blood to spill.

Much of the book is devoted to covering basic and advanced Deathmatch tactics which have long since become staples of the FPS genre, especially in the aftermath of the success seen with Quake 3 and the Unreal Tournament franchise, but what makes this book important from a historical standpoint is the snapshot in time it offers the reader. Documented within is the genesis of FPS gaming, the rise of online gaming, snapshots of popular gaming culture like cartoons produced using Quake's graphical engine and a listing of a number of different Clans who existed at the time, and even a look at new and upcoming gaming peripherals, like the SpaceOrb 360 controller, the VooDoo graphics card, and the MMX instruction set for Pentium-class computers.

I've included an .iso rip of the CD which came with the book. This includes a slew of deathmatch levels for your favorite games; demo file walkthroughs for every level in Quake, Ultimate Doom, Doom II, Duke Nukem 3D and the Atomic Edition/Plutonium Pak; a utility for converting Doom levels into Duke 3D levels; and a "secret Quake bonus" hidden somewhere on the disc for you to find. (No, don't ask me what/where it is--I'm not telling!). The DEATHMATCH.ISO file is included in the .cbz file, so open that with your favorite file compression utility, extract it, and get to playing around!

As usual for books like this, pages which were completely blank were omitted in order to reduce file size. :)

Enjoy! ‚̧ԳŹ

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This was my favorite era of PC gaming. So much ground was being broken every day! I remember having to buy 3D Accelerator cards that were separate from your graphics cards, because graphics cards couldn't handle the load by themselves. And I remember "multiplayer networks" which were unified lobby systems that let you connect to other players to find multiplayer games, because game companies hosting their own servers wasn't a thing (whether or not it becoming a think is a debate with no black or white answer). WON (the World Opponent Network), TEN (the Total Entertainment Network), MPlayer, Gamespy, and my personal favorite, Segasoft's HEAT.net (I still haver their multiplayer start-up kit on my shelf). 

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1 hour ago, WraithTDK said:

This was my favorite era of PC gaming. So much ground was being broken every day! I remember having to buy 3D Accelerator cards that were separate from your graphics cards, because graphics cards couldn't handle the load by themselves. And I remember "multiplayer networks" which were unified lobby systems that let you connect to other players to find multiplayer games, because game companies hosting their own servers wasn't a thing (whether or not it becoming a think is a debate with no black or white answer). WON (the World Opponent Network), TEN (the Total Entertainment Network), MPlayer, Gamespy, and my personal favorite, Segasoft's HEAT.net (I still haver their multiplayer start-up kit on my shelf). 

The HEAT.net starter kit came with a t-shirt which read, "Cyber bullets cause no pain." I'm pretty sure I still have mine somewhere. :)

*huggles*
Areala :angel:

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