kitsunebi77

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On 8/14/2019 at 3:22 AM, kitsunebi77 said:

Here's a guide to the original Castlevania for the Famicom:

https://archive.org/details/castlevaniaakumajodraculakanpekikouryakuhon

And although it's already available, I re-upped the Super Castlevania IV guide since I had to re-edit the front/back dust jacket and interior covers into separate pages (it's otherwise identical to the already available file).

https://archive.org/details/supercastlevaniaivakumajonodraculanosubete

 

The Super Castlevania guidebook should include some reference to Hippon Super, so we know it's part of that magazine. If that mag is ever scanned, we can include all of them together. Not sure how many other guidebooks Hippon Super made.

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1 hour ago, JonnyCGood said:

The Super Castlevania guidebook should include some reference to Hippon Super, so we know it's part of that magazine. If that mag is ever scanned, we can include all of them together. Not sure how many other guidebooks Hippon Super made.

I disagree, but you've got your own copy of it out there if you want to describe it that way.  This guide is not a special edition, supplement, or any other direct relation to Hippon Super. 

It is published by JCC Publishing, and edited by Ichiro Tezuka and Studio BentStuff (which continues to release guides to this day).

Many if not most strategy guides in Japan are "from the editors of" such and such magazine, but that doesn't make them part of that magazine, just as a movie "from the producers of Schindler's List" doesn't mean it's a sequel or in any way related to Schindler's List aside from one or more staff members they share in common.  As you're aware, most Japanese magazines have extensive strategy sections, and often this material is reused and expanded/updated for publication in book form. But again, I don't think that makes the guide a publication of the magazine.  If we ever scan Hippon Super at Retromags, it will be kept in the magazine section, and any guides which were not included as free supplements which members of their staff were involved in will be kept separate in the strategy guide section.

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On 9/2/2019 at 7:37 AM, kitsunebi77 said:

I disagree, but you've got your own copy of it out there if you want to describe it that way.  This guide is not a special edition, supplement, or any other direct relation to Hippon Super.

Oh, I removed my copy since I don't like duplication.

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Just now, JonnyCGood said:

Oh, I removed my copy since I don't like duplication.

I noticed some jacktard copied one of the files you uploaded, compressed it into a lossy PDF and re-uploaded it (for what purpose, I don't know.)  In the lawless wasteland known as the Internet Archive, duplication will probably happen whether you want it or not, I'm afraid.

Hell, I don't like people uploading my scans there, but what can you do?😕

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Well, this only took 6 hours for the IA to derive...such an annoying site...

Anyway.  Here's a short guide for a game that totally doesn't deserve its reputation!  Well, that's my take on it, anyway.  But maybe some of you don't mind the grind. 

https://archive.org/details/phantasystariihisshoukouryakuhouhowtowin

large.169184010_PhantasyStarII-WinningStrategy.jpg

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I think Phantasy Star II derives its well-loved reputation from being the first 16-bit RPG many people experienced in the US. That, along with being an upgrade to virtually every aspect of the first game including characters which join and depart the party across the story (one even gets story-killed, which you never saw in console RPGs to that point), and beating Final Fantasy to market in the West, give people my age fond memories of enjoying all those surprising firsts. :)

I never cared for the original Phantasy Star (navigating 3D mazes of 10'x10' corridors which all lack defining features is a skill I am terrible with), but Phantasy Star II was epic in every sense of the word for 1990 and I still love it today. :)

*huggles*
Areala

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6 hours ago, Areala said:

I think Phantasy Star II derives its well-loved reputation from being the first 16-bit RPG many people experienced in the US. That, along with being an upgrade to virtually every aspect of the first game including characters which join and depart the party across the story (one even gets story-killed, which you never saw in console RPGs to that point), and beating Final Fantasy to market in the West, give people my age fond memories of enjoying all those surprising firsts. :)

I never cared for the original Phantasy Star (navigating 3D mazes of 10'x10' corridors which all lack defining features is a skill I am terrible with), but Phantasy Star II was epic in every sense of the word for 1990 and I still love it today. :)

I know there are games I would defend similarly, but as someone who is looking at these games objectively in the year 2019, all I heard was "PSII is an excellent game because nostalgia nostalgia nostalgia nostalgia nostalgia nostalgia nostalgia nostalgia and nostalgia."😉😋  Alas, my opinion remains unswayed (although you do make a case for its historical significance in the US market).🙂

As for 3D tile-based dungeon crawlers, anyone who doesn't enjoy making maps isn't meant to play those games.  In fact, I would say that for their intended audience, making maps is THE most enjoyable aspect of playing such games.  Of course, in that regard, the original Phantasy Star is also crap, because its dungeons are so boring.  I think there is literally one secret door in the entire game, and no other interesting mapping challenges.

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Something people may not realize about Japan is that they tend to not care for books which are too thick.  This isn't always true of course, and it's easy to find 1000 page strategy guides for the latest Pokemon games if that's your thing, but in general, when a book is too long, they split it in half.  Most of the Harry Potter series, for example, are split in half and sold as two volumes each.  In addition to doubling the profits of booksellers, I suppose it has the benefit of making the books easier to hold.

Still, it's a little strange that this guide to Phantasy Star III is split into two volumes, since each one is only around 120 pages.  Perhaps they weren't quite finished but wanted to get the guide to market while the game was new, so they released what they had as volume 1 and released volume 2  month later once they'd finished?  Who knows.

https://archive.org/details/phantasystariiiattackmanualbookvol.1

https://archive.org/details/phantasystariiiattackmanualbookvol.2

large.142386294_PhantasyStarIII-AttackManualBookVol.1.jpglarge.199861559_PhantasyStarIII-AttackManualBookVol.2.jpg

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3 hours ago, kitsunebi77 said:

Something people may not realize about Japan is that they tend to not care for books which are too thick.  This isn't always true of course, and it's easy to find 1000 page strategy guides for the latest Pokemon games if that's your thing, but in general, when a book is too long, they split it in half.  Most of the Harry Potter series, for example, are split in half and sold as two volumes each.  In addition to doubling the profits of booksellers, I suppose it has the benefit of making the books easier to hold.

I've wondered about this. I've seen numerous Japanese-language books come through at the bookstore, and it's always fun trying to match up and make sure all the volumes are there so they can be sold together (because what use is half a book?). Even stuff like "The Da Vinci Code", which is only around 400 pages, average for a hardcover thriller, got split in thirds for its Japanese publication.

Stuff like Murakami's "1Q84", which is something like 950 pages in its US edition, I can totally understand splitting. But "The Da Vinci Code"? Really...? :)

*huggles*
Areala

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I played Phantasy Star II some years ago. Struggled thru about 4 dungeons with 2 people for a while, really, wondering what was going on that nobody else was coming along. Then by chance I was in hero's hometown and decided to check out his home, hoping for a free bed. And there were like 5 characters, all waiting and all very low level. (no free bed, tho)

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And here's the best of the series (supposedly - I've never played it), and the only one deemed worthy to be included in the recent Genesis/Mega Drive Mini systems' selection of games - Phantasy Star IV (or Phantasy Star: The End of the Millennium as it was called in Japan.)

https://archive.org/details/phantasystarivgameguidebook

large.717949748_PhantasyStarIV-GameGuideBook.jpg

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Sega's Sword of Vermilion (or simply Vermilion, as it's known in Japan) is an action RPG much like Elder Scrolls Skyrim, except for being more primitive, simplistic, and, well...shitty of an order of magnitude so vast as to be difficult to put into words.  Enjoy. 😉

https://archive.org/details/swordofvermilionattackmanualbook

large.59564798_SwordofVermilion-AttackManualBook.jpg

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Musings...

A great game is a great game, but to a certain degree, our interest in games begins with the aesthetics.

We all probably know at least one self-proclaimed "otaku" who thinks that everything that comes out of Japan is THE BEST THING EVAR and gets wet looking at any game with typically generic anime-style character designs...

BUT

Do you ever wonder if there is a subset of Japanese gamers who get off on playing games from the West where characters look less like cartoons, men have hair on their faces, and the women all look older than 13?

A case of "the grass is always greener" going both ways?

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4 hours ago, kitsunebi77 said:

Do you ever wonder if there is a subset of Japanese gamers who get off on playing games from the West where characters look less like cartoons, men have hair on their faces, and the women all look older than 13?

Probably the 5 guys who bought Xbox Ones in Japan.

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7 hours ago, kitsunebi77 said:

Do you ever wonder if there is a subset of Japanese gamers who get off on playing games from the West where characters look less like cartoons, men have hair on their faces, and the women all look older than 13?

A case of "the grass is always greener" going both ways?

By law of probability there almost has to be, although I'd be surprised if they were as 'loud and proud' about it as the obnoxious wing of the West's otaku crowd. Strikes me as the sort of thing one keeps to one's self in Japan. But maybe not. :)

*huggles*
Areala

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Well, I know how much you guys love it when I upload guides to old Japanese computer games, so here's a twofer for ya.

The original Phantasie was an RPG developed by SSI for the Apple II.  It would eventually become a trilogy of games, but they don't seem to be especially well-remembered today.  It's possible they were more successful in Japan, however, since (much like the Wizardry series), the series was picked up later and continued by Japanese developers.  Thus, Phantasie IV is a Japanese-developed, Japanese-exclusive sequel to a series of Western RPGs.

https://archive.org/details/phantasiehandbook

https://archive.org/details/phantasieivhandbook

large.1719196596_PhantasieHandBook.jpglarge.22228226_PhantasieIVHandbook.jpg

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1 hour ago, kitsunebi77 said:

The original Phantasie was an RPG developed by SSI for the Apple II. 

Is IV the Final Phantasie? 🤣

Imagine if this series was the one that took off and survived, not Final Fantasy of Phantasy Star.

 

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17 minutes ago, Ethereal Dragonz said:

Is IV the Final Phantasie? 🤣

Imagine if this series was the one that took off and survived, not Final Fantasy of Phantasy Star.

 

From what I gather from other peoples' opinions (having never played any of the series myself), Phantasie is a poor man's Ultima.  And for whatever reason, Ultima is the one series of classic RPGs I've never been able to get into (despite enjoying my time spent with Wizardry and my personal favorite, Might & Magic.)  So I doubt it would interest me.  But then, neither do Final Fantasy or Phantasy Star.  Or Fantasy Zone.  I guess I just don't care about series with variations of that word. 😋

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These guides were both published on the same day, covering the same game.  Because $$$, I guess.  (or ¥ ¥ ¥ , more accurately).  Coincidentally, I've recently been reading the Record of Lodoss War manga (which isn't bad) and trying to force myself to watch the OVA series (which isn't good).  This game hasn't been translated into English (non-porn Japanese computer games almost never are), but it's apparently a western-style RPG, which leads me to think it could possibly be enjoyable.  Anyway, there is some nice artwork here, including some cute super-deformed versions of the characters.

https://archive.org/details/recordoflodosswarhandbook1

https://archive.org/details/recordoflodosswarhandbook2

large.1851269313_RecordofLodossWar1HandBook.jpglarge.1352355098_RecordofLodossWarHandBook2.jpg

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And here's a guide to the Sega CD RPG, Record of Lodoss War.  This is a completely different game from the computer versions above, and is a typical JRPG-style game.  This mook came with a CD-ROM, but when I tried mounting it, I got a message that it's corrupted, so I didn't bother uploading it.  Then I took a look at the scans of the CD and realized that it's a Mega CD disc, so maybe it would work with an emulator?  Ah well.  Does anyone actually care?

https://archive.org/details/recordoflodosswarofficialguidemook

large.1957818375_RecordofLodossWarOfficialGuideMook.jpg

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