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Areala Asks: "Bringing the Apocalypse" (20160408)


Areala
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One of T.S. Eliot's most famous stanzas is the conclusion to "The Hollow Men":

This is the way the world ends

This is the way the world ends

This is the way the world ends

Not with a bang, but a whimper.

Stephen King used it as an epigraph for "The Stand", and he chose to end the world with a mega-strain of the flu that killed off 99% of the planet. Now it's your turn.

Suppose you were going to be stuck as an embattled survivor of Armageddon. What apocalypse scenario would you choose to live through if you had to pick one? Nuclear war? Zombie uprising? Alien invasion? Something else?

Go nuts. Let's see who's got the best imagination. Where are you and what will you be doing when the shit hits the fan? Your worshipful Warrior Nun grants you seven days to consider your doomsday preparations; we'll move on to another topic come April 15th. Think about it. Make your stand. :)

*huggles*
Areala

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(Warning: a wee bit of sexual content in here).

Flash back to the spring of 2005, when the entire world breathlessly awaited the release of Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. It was to be the Star Wars film that fans had waited all their lives for, the movie that finally revealed what caused Anakin Skywalker to turn to the dark side and become legendary supervillain Darth Vader. It was also intended to be, as everyone understood it, the very last new Star Wars film that we'd ever get. Expectations were high. Excitement was through the roof.

Around this time I was talking to my favorite cousin, a guy about my age and with roughly the same sense of humor. He wasn't a Star Wars fan at the time - he tolerated them and picked a few elements that he enjoyed from each film but generally found the whole affair to be tedious, due more to the fanaticism of many of its fans than the quality of the actual films themselves. We were on the phone one day during one of our many hours-long conversations and the subject of the last Star Wars film was raised. How is it going to end?

There was some back and forth discussion, mostly realistic stuff. Maybe Anakin will turn because of this. Maybe Darth Vader will come to power because of that. We talked of the various rumors that were floating around, as well as things that fans were hoping would or would not come to fruition. There was a lot at stake with this film, not just the saving of the prequel trilogy but the redemption in many fan's eyes of the Star Wars franchise as a whole. The prequel-era image of George Lucas as a self-indulgent, legacy destroying hack was brought into the discussion, and I think it was I who made an amusing observation. "You know what would REALLY piss the Star Wars fans off? If the film was really good, got like two hours deep, hovered right on the verge of the big reveal, and then abruptly cut to footage of George Lucas furiously masturbating. End scene, cut to credits (complete with the famous John Williams fanfare, of course)".

As always happens between my cousin and I, we immediately began escalating the absurdity of the hypothetical scenario by bouncing more humorous details back and forth in rapid-fire succession. "He's giving the middle finger while he's doing it", my cousin added. "He comes right into the camera", I pitched. "RIGHT into the camera". It took all of ten seconds for us to turn the idea of this decades-long moment of suspense into nothing more than an obscene, self-serving gesture of brazen hostility towards the audience.

"The audience would riot", I said. "I mean not just yell and piss and moan, I mean actually tear seats from the theater floor and throw them through the screen". My cousin responded with his own imagery. "The fans would be so enraged that they'd quickly turn their hostilities towards each other. People in the theater would be punching each other in the face". "There'd be stabbings", I added. "People will be hanged in the lobby. "The ecstatic moans of George Lucas will be the soundtrack to the revolution", said my cousin.

We quickly concluded that the rage could not be contained in the theater and would spill into the streets. Not just a single theater either, of course, but EVERY theater in the country. At roughly 2:00 AM on May 20th, 2005, the apocalypse would begin. Hordes of people would emerge from their screenings, throngs of humanity locked in violence. Corpses would litter the roads. Property would be destroyed. Fires would flare from every neighborhood. At home, the people who for some reason hadn't attended the film would turn from their televisions to look out the window and see armed citizens running through the streets. "They would know what must be done", I said. My cousin agreed. "They'd answer the call to action. They'd solemnly nod and leave the window to retrieve their axes and pith helmets".

I concluded that the first hour would be anarchy but that the crowds would quickly mobilize and form factions of original trilogy fans and prequel trilogy fans. In a single night they would run across the landscape in armies hundreds of thousands strong, savagely screaming with weapons held aloft. "They'll run beyond the streets seeking their foes", my cousin said. "Into the water. Across the plains. Through the forest".

"They'll encounter Bigfoot", I said. "The horde of people will be so large and cover so much ground that they'll stumble upon him while he's just doing his thing in the woods. They'll spot each other and stop. The mutual shock will be so palpable that Bigfoot and the angry Star Wars army will just stand there staring at each other in disbelief. Then all at once the crowd will resume screaming and rush him".

"Bigfoot will be immediately engaged".

"The fans will storm the White House. There will be martial law. The clans will clash with spears and clubs and flaming swords. Some will still be in costume. Many will be wearing armor. Others will commandeer fighter jets and drop bombs from overhead. In mere hours entire cities will be burned to the ground. The unrest would spread across continents. Terrified governments will respond by launching thermonuclear war. There will be human sacrifices and new world orders. The dead will rise for some reason".

Needless to say, this went on for some time before we finally became so exhausted and sore from laughter that we finally just had to kind of catch our breaths and hope that this wasn't how things were going to go down before quickly agreeing that no, actually, that would probably be the raddest way for things to go down. Unfortunately Revenge of the Sith wound up being great and humanity never got the chance to put its primordial survival instincts to the test of its natural limits. ...Yet.

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Hey Mike, there's still the future Star Wars movies in the making, so there's still a chance. Enjoyed your story, thanks for sharing.

As for me, I see something more akin to Idiocracy. When it came out, it seemed a silly movie, but the more I see of society, the more I realize that Mike Judge was on to something with that film... I see humanity going down without so much as an epic fight, but with a slowly degrading sense of responsibility. We'll simply accept everything as it comes, never making the effort to improve our lives, or even think them through, for that matter. Apathy will eventually lead to stagnation, economically speaking. Fools will continue to push the influence of bad foreign policy until it bankrupts the country. Dependence upon the government will increase exponentially, until those who worked become taxed to the point that they give up bothering to work.

Eventually... we'll all starve, and historians of the far future will dig up the remains of America. At some point in their analysis, they will realize that we had the most solid foundation that a budding country could have possibly asked for, and we threw it all away in the name of mediocrity and fairness.

On the plus side, while I enjoy my life, I have absolutely no need to cling to it as if it is the end all be all of existence. Not too terribly worried, so when the shit inevitably hits the fan, I'll do what I can to enjoy survival in the last age, but you won't see me going out any more than I would absolutely have to... Once I run out of supplies to live on, then I accept the eventual fate that we all share, I have no fear of death anymore.

Sorry if it's a bit depressing, but the more you pay attention to the world around us, the more you notice how much the fan stinks...

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When I was in high school I fantasized about everyone disappearing and what it would be like to wake up in the morning with everyone gone. What would I do? How long would I survive? What would I think? When I was finally liberated from schooling I stopped imagining that sort of thing, but when I do think about the end of the world, I think about it in terms of an asteroid impact or a supervolcano eruption. How would day-to-day life and economics change? Then there's the real terrifying scenario of a magnetic pole reversal or solar storm that wipes out the electrical grid for years at a time. There would be so much fear and panic.

As far as which one I would choose, obviously a robot uprising or alien invasion, which I imagine would be the same thing. :arc:

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Unfortunately Revenge of the Sith wound up being great and humanity never got the chance to put its primordial survival instincts to the test of its natural limits. ...Yet.

Speaking as someone who's entire childhood revolved around the original trilogy, I can say that as amusing as your story is, I can't agree with its (admittedly extremely exaggerated) plausibility. Sure, ep III was the best of the prequels, but it was still terrible in my book. However, by the time it came out, the previous two had already bruised and beaten whatever love I had for the franchise in my heart to the point where not even Lucas's antics in your scenario could have gotten a rise out of me. (Actually, I'm pretty sure he's furiously masturbating while giving the finger to the audience in literally EVERY FRAME of that trilogy...you just can't see it because it's happening behind the green screen.) Even now, after epVII has redeemed the franchise and Rogue One looks promising, I still can't fangasm over the series' future in quite the same way as I would have had those prequels never happened. So I just can't get on board with your scenario. Maybe if it had been Episode I that was awesome until the very end it would make more sense to me, since everyone's expectations were still high and untainted at that point. Still, nice post.

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Hey Mike, there's still the future Star Wars movies in the making, so there's still a chance. Enjoyed your story, thanks for sharing.

This is true. And if it happens, I'll have my trusty crowbar ready.

Glad you enjoyed it, hanks for reading.

Speaking as someone who's entire childhood revolved around the original trilogy, I can say that as amusing as your story is, I can't agree with its (admittedly extremely exaggerated) plausibility. Sure, ep III was the best of the prequels, but it was still terrible in my book.

To each their own, my friend. I can't think of five things that I like about Episode I (I can get to about four). Meanwhile I can't think of five things that I dislike about Revenge of the Sith. :)

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To each their own, my friend. I can't think of five things that I like about Episode I (I can get to about four). Meanwhile I can't think of five things that I dislike about Revenge of the Sith. :)

It wouldn't bother me that I dislike them if I could just brush them aside and pretend they never happened. Unfortunately, the cumulative disappointment of the three prequels ended up tainting my feelings toward the original trilogy somewhat, which was once one of my pure, true loves. More than anything bad about the movies themselves, that's what I dislike about them - the fact that they've diminished my enthusiasm to a degree for all things Star Wars, prequel or no. Thus my reaction to your doomsday scenario would be one of melancholy bordering on apathy, not rage-induced rioting.

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It wouldn't bother me that I dislike them if I could just brush them aside and pretend they never happened. Unfortunately, the cumulative disappointment of the three prequels ended up tainting my feelings toward the original trilogy somewhat, which was once one of my pure, true loves. More than anything bad about the movies themselves, that's what I dislike about them - the fact that they've diminished my enthusiasm to a degree for all things Star Wars, prequel or no. Thus my reaction to your doomsday scenario would be one of melancholy bordering on apathy, not rage-induced rioting.

Yeah, but I'd like to think that you'd get swept up in the carnage all the same. If not out of legitimate rage, then out of the urge to do something fun and productive.

I've been told that I compartmentalize really well, at least regarding things that I like. I thoroughly enjoyed Jeepers Creepers despite the fact that it was directed by a massive, slovenly, convicted child molester, I still love watching Chris Benoit matches despite the fact that the man murdered his entire family, and I will always love Revenge of the Sith despite the fact that The Phantom Menace and much of Attack of the Clones exist.

So you see? All you have to do to enjoy Revenge of the Sith is to learn to look past the thing that Jeepers Creepers, Chris Benoit, and the other two prequels all have in common: The rape and murder of youth.

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First off The Phantom Menace was the only prequel movie I liked. It had a promising start. RoS was a hot mess. Only slightly better than Clone Wars.

An apocalypse is so ok in would be the one where all people disappear , like Last Man on Earth. Or that other old movie I think was called Silent Earth. Where everyone just disappears except you or a few other people.

I'd travel the world looking for other people. I'd sleep in furniture store showrooms. Build and perfect portable power charging systems and make my own hydrogen fuel or ethanol. I'd go on quest to find one of every super bowl ring and wear them proudly at all times. (Finding Joe Montana's and Tom Brady's corpse would be must.) I'd spend a few years at the Smitsonian. And reading at the library of congress.

Yes I'd chose a benign but lonely apocalypse.

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First off The Phantom Menace was the only prequel movie I liked. It had a promising start. RoS was a hot mess. Only slightly better than Clone Wars.

An apocalypse is so ok in would be the one where all people disappear , like Last Man on Earth. Or that other old movie I think was called Silent Earth. Where everyone just disappears except you or a few other people.

I'd travel the world looking for other people. I'd sleep in furniture store showrooms. Build and perfect portable power charging systems and make my own hydrogen fuel or ethanol. I'd go on quest to find one of every super bowl ring and wear them proudly at all times. (Finding Joe Montana's and Tom Brady's corpse would be must.) I'd spend a few years at the Smitsonian. And reading at the library of congress.

Yes I'd chose a benign but lonely apocalypse.

So you'd go all "Time Enough At Last" for your choice? Interesting...interesting... :)

I love every idea you guys have posted so far! Those of you who aren't answering, jump right in! Nobody will make fun of you. Share your apocalypse fantasies. :)

*huggles*

Areala

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How about this one...and please - I'm not trying to offend anyone or get into a debate - this is purely fictional speculation.

Suppose I was to be left behind after The Rapture. But not just the Christian one, but one that claimed all devout believers of any faith. Leaving only the faithless behind. Not to plagues of pestilence and famine or any kind of cataclysmic upheaval, just left behind to inherit the Earth as it is.

Sure, I wouldn't be alone (especially here in Japan lol), but it would still be a pretty massive exodus of people, enough to qualify as apocalyptic in scope. This would no doubt play havok with the infrastructure of society as those left behind scramble to figure out how to redistribute power and responsibilities to keep things running. But once the dust settled, would it really be so bad? One of the major dividers and sources of conflict within humanity would no longer be an issue at the very least (not that there aren't plenty of other things to keep people busy disliking one another). It would be interesting to see in what ways things would be better or worse in such a world.

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How about this one...and please - I'm not trying to offend anyone or get into a debate - this is purely fictional speculation.

Suppose I was to be left behind after The Rapture. But not just the Christian one, but one that claimed all devout believers of any faith. Leaving only the faithless behind. Not to plagues of pestilence and famine or any kind of cataclysmic upheaval, just left behind to inherit the Earth as it is.

Sure, I wouldn't be alone (especially here in Japan lol), but it would still be a pretty massive exodus of people, enough to qualify as apocalyptic in scope. This would no doubt play havok with the infrastructure of society as those left behind scramble to figure out how to redistribute power and responsibilities to keep things running. But once the dust settled, would it really be so bad? One of the major dividers and sources of conflict within humanity would no longer be an issue at the very least (not that there aren't plenty of other things to keep people busy disliking one another). It would be interesting to see in what ways things would be better or worse in such a world.

Hard to imagine given that "devout" can mean many things and "faith" isn't that precise of a word either. Would it include people who worship sports or their country's flag or have unquestioning loyalties to other institutions?

Then there's the evidence left behind that people disappeared from the face of the planet because they believed something. Would other people see this evidence and then conclude that they might leave too if they believed strongly enough? You might have more religion left behind than you think!

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Hard to imagine given that "devout" can mean many things and "faith" isn't that precise of a word either. Would it include people who worship sports or their country's flag or have unquestioning loyalties to other institutions?

Then there's the evidence left behind that people disappeared from the face of the planet because they believed something. Would other people see this evidence and then conclude that they might leave too if they believed strongly enough? You might have more religion left behind than you think!

True, I meant the definition of faith that goes "belief in God or in the doctrines or teachings of religion," not the more general definition.

Also, if all such people were to suddenly disappear, would it just be me that would find that terrifying? The only "evidence" would be the correlation between those who vanished and those with strong religious beliefs. If I were to accept that as the actual cause and effect inherent in religious faith, I'd more more likely than ever to refute it. Why would I want to disappear from existence? Even if I were to come to believe that religion would lead to disappearing, I'd have no reason to believe that disappearing was a good thing or evidence of an afterlife. Of course, if the world were to turn to turmoil and chaos, then I suppose some people might look at such an end as a blessing, even if it ultimately led nowhere, for the same reason people will kill themselves when the prospect of continuing to exist is harder for them to bear than the alternative.

But to make things simple, let's just say this was a one-time deal, so no amount of religious fervor after the fact will enable anyone else to disappear to who-knows-where.

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First off The Phantom Menace was the only prequel movie I liked. It had a promising start. RoS was a hot mess. Only slightly better than Clone Wars.

The Phantom Menace is literally one of the worst movies I've ever seen, and I would argue one of the worst movies ever made. The acting is terrible. The script is terrible. The plot is terrible. The pacing is terrible. Loads of individual choices are terrible (Why do aliens have so many ethnic accents? Why did you have Anakin build C-3PO? Why did you completely retcon the definition of the force? Why did you imply that Anakin was immaculately conceived? Why did you hide Darth Maul in the shadows for 90 percent of the film and then kill him after ten minutes of screen time? Why was the podrace scene 15 minutes long? Why was it narrated by Greg Proops using a voice that sounded like it was ripped straight from a modern day racing commentator from Earth? Why was the entire plot motivated by trade disputes? What is the practical purpose of those multiple force field walls that prevent Obi-Wan from helping Qui-Gon, other than to serve the plot?)

I could keep going but I think you get my sentiment. Everyone passionately hates the walking Stepin Fetchit comedy routine that is Jar Jar Binks, and with good reason, but I just rattled off an entire paragraph of things to hate about that film without even getting to him. That's how god-awful The Phantom Menace is. If you want to call Revenge if the SIth a hot mess that's fine but if you're going to do it in comparison to this piece of nightmare filth then people are definitely going to have some questions for you. :)

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While I agree with some of those things, the sequels have much more things I can't stand. Like the phantom menace was a good start. Maybe the best light saber battle of the whole prequel trilogy. The pod race scene was classic. My main issues are the stereotyped characters. And Jar Jar Binks is a little too over the top. I can still watch the phantom menace. I can't rewardh the other two.mthey just aren't entertaining to me at all.

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I can agree that the final lightsaber battle in Phantom Menace is decent. The only part of the movie I can stomach, but at least it's something. The main problem with the entire trilogy is, as you said, the characters. There isn't a single likeable or charismatic character in any of the three films. Darth Maul came the closest, and he only spoke 5 sentences. Anakin should have been the most interesting character, since the audience already knows he becomes Vader - a very popular and well-drawn character whose origins people had been speculating about ever since first introduced. Alas, the audience had no recourse but to hate Anakin throughout all three films - not because he was evil, but because he was so bland.

You know what, Mike? Let's change your scenario. Screw this prequel noise. No one's gonna riot over any of them - they just aren't worth it.

Here's what really causes the Star Wars Fanboy Apocalypse:

Episode VII is beloved by fans. Rogue One, too is embraced upon release and proves that the franchise has a life beyond the core story of the Skywalkers. Episode VIII trailers are released and it looks to be the best one yet. People are excited for the future and finally beginning to put the painful memories of the prequels behind them. There truly is A New Hope.

And then...

On the dawn of the release of episode VIII...as the largest mass of fanboys ever assembled in one place are camped out in line for tickets...George Lucas rolls up in a limo, whips out a megaphone, and announces to the world that he just re-purchased the complete ownership rights to the Star Wars franchise and that his first act as owner was to destroy all copies of the Disney-supervised films. Episode VII and Rogue One will be pulled from the shelves, and Ep VIII will never even see the light of day. But not to worry, because he's made plans to write and direct a series of new Star Wars films himself using 100% CG actors a la Avatar. This is necessary, he explains, because there won't be any human characters in the films, only creatures. "The kids are gonna love it!" he promises, tossing stuffed plushies of new adorable characters from his upcoming merchandising bonanza into the crowd of fanboys whose expressions of shock and betrayal are slowly shifting into those of rage and murderous intent. THEN, Lucas whips it out and furiously masturbates while giving them all the finger.

You see, NOW your apocalyptic fanboy riots make sense.

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Nah, see, the fanboys riot not because they were loving everything that they'd been given to that point, but because the empty promises and dashed hopes have caused their frustration to reach a plateau. They're giving Lucas his final chance, reluctantly allowing themselves to buy into what appears to be one final, truly heartfelt promise to drop the bullshit and be good, and then they're violently stabbed through the heart with a lightsaber at PRECISELY the moment they were won over enough to believe that that trust was finally going to be rewarded. The fans don't lose their shit because they were kicked out of a limo, the fans lose their shit because their buddy in the hooptie kept doing that thing where he kept braking and pulling forward to trick them into thinking that he was going to stop and let them get in. Then backed over them at full speed.

Anyway I'll give TPM Qui-Gon, I actually had no problem with that character. I felt that Liam Neeson brought some much-needed dignity and restraint to the film and was, as a result, one of the very few things that I legitimately enjoyed about it. Also, the Phantom Menace duel WAS good - that eight or ten second series of attacks and parries between Obi-Wan and Maul immediately after Obi-Wan is let free of the force field walls is probably my favorite single lightsaber trade in the entirety of the films. It's hard for me to say whether it's the best duel - the most proficient, I suppose, and the three-person dynamic was really interesting (and incredibly awesome the first time I saw it). I also give that duel points for being particularly well-shot. Lots of dramatic wide angles and sustained shots, something that they didn't do very much in the prequel trilogy. That said I've got a soft spot for Anakin / Obi-Wan from Sith, and I greatly enjoyed the two duels at the end of Force Awakens for the sheer simplicity of the combat. By that I mean that there were zero flips, zero moments of grandstanding - it was simply two people striking hard with lightsabers in an attempt to win.

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Whearas in the prequel sequels, when Zelds drops his cane like a microphone drop and starts jumping around like a mad man from some anime, I copletely busted out laughing uncontrollably. Totally ruining any and all levity that scene may have been trying to portray. Plus the CG just wasn't believable. Qui Gon was fantastic, as was paduaon Obi Wan. Really and all that build up to Vader and all we get is a big NOOOOOOOOO!? The first movie is a perfectly salvageable Anakin origin story. The other two the plot veers so far sideways that I don't find them believable. If it was up to me, the Anakin would turn to Vader at the end of the second movie, or maybe come about at the beggining of the third and lead the charge against the Jedi. I wanted a whole movie of bad ass Daeth Vader dammit. As it is , Darth Vader AS Vader is largely unexplored as a character.

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True, I meant the definition of faith that goes "belief in God or in the doctrines or teachings of religion," not the more general definition.

Also, if all such people were to suddenly disappear, would it just be me that would find that terrifying? The only "evidence" would be the correlation between those who vanished and those with strong religious beliefs. If I were to accept that as the actual cause and effect inherent in religious faith, I'd more more likely than ever to refute it. Why would I want to disappear from existence? Even if I were to come to believe that religion would lead to disappearing, I'd have no reason to believe that disappearing was a good thing or evidence of an afterlife. Of course, if the world were to turn to turmoil and chaos, then I suppose some people might look at such an end as a blessing, even if it ultimately led nowhere, for the same reason people will kill themselves when the prospect of continuing to exist is harder for them to bear than the alternative.

But to make things simple, let's just say this was a one-time deal, so no amount of religious fervor after the fact will enable anyone else to disappear to who-knows-where.

Well if the only evidence is that they disappeared and shared a belief in God, combined with existing scripture saying that would happen, then in such matters where an all powerful being operates, a "one time deal" might be hard for some people to believe. You'd be asking them to take it on faith. :)

And I'm sure some wouldn't see it as simply disappearing, since energy can't be created or destroyed, but as possibly being transported or changed somehow. Being the imaginative sort of fellow I am, I would imagine they were all beamed by some alien race as part of an experiment and prepare for the coming invasion.

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Also, if all such people were to suddenly disappear, would it just be me that would find that terrifying?

Speaking as one who wouldn't be around to find out, I enjoy reading your thoughts on this one. Religion as a whole, across the board, has been a source of so much conflict, that I'd welcome a world without it. Religion itself always seemed to me to be a work of man, not any deity, but rather a means to control and influence. The world as a whole would be better off without it.

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i am floored that someone is arguing that the Phantom Menace was not only the best of the prequel films, but actually GOOD. i can't wrap my head around it. i found the prequels overall to be decent, or good enough, and think they generally get an unfair rap. that being said, TPM was freaking terrible and i see very little redeemable about it. Obi-Wan was pretty good, Qui-Gon was serviceable, and the final lightsaber battle was great.

the kid that played Anakin was pure shit, Jar Jar obviously was garbage, and the pod race (what most people point to as being the highlight) was ten times longer than it needed to be.

back to the topic at hand, in an armageddon scenario, i forsee some worldwide electromagnetic pulse. it renders every electrical device completely worthless. and i don't mean for an hour, or a day, or a month. i mean practically forever. let's say that the aftereffects wear off in 100 years. nothing that uses electricity is usable, anything that uses batteries is highly disrupted and also dead after a day.

we may as well be cavemen. i don't think most people can function without a smart phone these days. Hell, most of my friends can't read a map or follow directions. my sister-in-law (she's like 22) doesn't understand phone books. no microwaves, no vehicles, no iPads. this leads to one of three things happening.

1: everybody just loses their goddamn minds and murders each other whilst looting and robbing all of these worthless items.

2: the world finds a way to cope and adapt. this probably leads to the all-too-popular steampunk idea becoming a reality.

3: (my personal favorite) it is like the middle ages again. torches, traveling by horseback, and suits of armor and swords. now, i'd probably be fucking in this situation because i've never ridden a horse or had a swordfight, but man, it would be awesome.

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Twiztor, interesting scenario. However, what is stopping folks from making new items that the EMP takes out? Also, while we're a dying breed, there are some of us out there who can still tinker and fabricate, know how to operate older vehicles, etc...

That said, a LOT of folks wouldn't have the first clue. Myself? I'd probably starve for lack of much of a hunting instinct, or knowledge of what is edible, how to cook it, etc.

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i am floored that someone is arguing that the Phantom Menace was not only the best of the prequel films, but actually GOOD.

I know. I'm sitting here like, "I know I told you guys to envision the apocalypse, but great snapping arseholes, WTF?!" :)

That said, I do feel bad for Jake Lloyd. He got cast in the movie for what should have been a career-launching role, and instead he's been ridiculed, bullied, and harassed his whole life for something that basically wasn't his fault, and that any 10 year old boy at the time would have happily killed someone else in order to get. No matter how bad a film is, no kid deserves the levels of shit that got heaped on him for simply doing what he was told regarding the script as it was written.

*huggles*

Areala

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Areala, you make a good point there. However, how many child actors would you say would have been good for a role like that? I mean, for all it matters, they could have cast the kid that played Dewey on Malcolm in the Middle. On that thought... hmm... that might have actually been pretty good, now that I think about it.

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