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Terry93D

Fanzine Listing

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At the prodding of RetroDefense, I am bringing over my list from Digital Press (where I am no longer active) to Retromags. Truthfully I ought to have done this a month ago; I am the great procrastinator, you see. Anyways. Here's the list with accompanying info on editor and links to whatever website/info there is on it.

  • 8/16
    Colin Hunt
  • Above and Beyond
    Tom Donoho
  • Access Time
    John Leverich & Genesis Kryscki
  • Adult Gamers Quarterly
    Rick Shrand
  • At the Controls
    Glenn Rubenstein
  • Atari Entertainment
    Edwin Stifter
  • Atari Magazin
    Robert Kaltenbrunn, later Werner Ratz
  • Atari Zone
    Dan Iacovelli [?]
  • Bit Age Times
  • Blip!
    Tim Johnson
  • BOOT! The Official Newsletter of LACE
  • Chrome
    Mike Histen
  • Circuit City Report
    Danny Tan & Terrence Yee
  • Classic Console Magazine
    Josh LaFrance
  • Classic Gamer Magazine
    Chris Cavanaugh
  • Classic Systems and Games Monthly
    Jeff Perkins
  • Codename: Megazine
  • Commodore Cracker
  • Commodore Faction
    David Connolly
  • Commodore Free
  • Commodore Zone
  • Computer Gaming Update
  • Concept
    Jess Ragan
  • Concordant Opposition
    Jeff Bogumil
  • Continue?
    Greg Wilcox
  • Control Freaks
  • Counterpoint!
    Tabitha Indigo Paige
  • Crappy, Cheaply Produced Newsletter About What Sucks
    Alan Lanoie
  • Cyber Beat
    Mike Ciletti
  • Denial
    Jeff Daniels
  • Digital Anime
    Eric Patterson
  • Digital Flair
    Dan Bowden
  • Digital Press
    Joe Santulli No. 1-49 / Dave Giarusso No. 50-? / Jeff Belmonte (or Jeff Spega) No 66-? with Tim Snider No. 67-?
  • Digital Savior
    Kevin Cline
  • Digital Storm
    Corey You
  • Dominion
    Nate Hineline
  • Dreamscape
    Frank Eva
  • DSX
    Corey You
  • Duh?!
    Carlton Rahmani
  • Duo-Dimensions
    Michael D. Babcock
  • Dystopia
    Dennis Crowley
  • Electro World
    Charlie Kraupp and Garrett Baldwin [?]
  • Electronics Conquest
    Brian Penzone
  • Entry Level
    David Hunt [?] and Tyrone Rodriguez
  • Escapist
    Michael Palisano (probably the same person as Mike Palisano)
  • EXCEL DISK MAGAZINE
    R. Stuart
  • exp. Magazine
  • Fanarchy
    Ben Leatherman
  • Fantazine
    Pat Reynolds
  • Feature
    Charles Brownstein
  • Forgotten Words
    Russell Loudin
  • Futura XL/XE Newsletter
    S. J. Murray
  • G-Force
    "Mr. Nutz"
  • Game Enthusiasts Magazine
  • Game Force
    Jeff Beedham
  • Game Mag
    Jon Ratcliffe
  • Game Masters
    Greg Meyers
  • Game Over
    Matt Leone
  • Game Rave
  • Game Star
    Mike Burns
  • Game Time with Mister Raroo
    Bill Sennwald
  • GameLord
    Pat Reynolds
  • Gamer X
  • Gamers Quarterly
    Ken Song
  • Gametron
  • Gaming Source
  • Genesian 
    Rick Shrand
  • GirlGames
  • Hardcore
    Tyrone Rodriguez
  • High Density
    Greg Bemis and Jonah Jackson
  • Hyperzine
    Matt Lotti
  • In Between the Lines
    Sean Pettibone
  • In Sights
    David Mussman
  • Infestation
    Alan Lanoie
  • Infiltration
    Lee Bridges
  • Intellivision Lines
    Ralph Linne
  • Jeff's MegaSports Wire
    Jeffrey Michael Tschiltsch
  • Jounrey's End
  • Joystick Jolter
  • KC Connection
    Ken Walls
  • Lynx User
    Edwin Stifter and Chris Wetherley
  • MASTERminds
    Todd Lintner
  • Matrix3
    Jeremy Statz
  • Media Point
    Nate Palmer
  • MegaForce
    A. J. Ramas
  • MegaGaming
  • MEGAmania
    Mike Pittaro
  • Metropolis
    James Catalano
  • Mindstorm
    Aaron Buckner
  • Monty's Kitten
    Brooks King
  • N.A.E.G.E. Journal
    Ed Finkler
  • Neo World
  • Neo-Lord
    Chris Dyer
  • New World News
    James Thomas
  • Next Generation
    Casey Loe
  • Overkill
    Rick Florey
  • Paradox
    Chris Johnston
  • PC Engine Gamer & ZX Spectrum Gamer
  • Phantasy Flight
    David Yan
  • Phanzine Star
    Noah Dziobecki
  • Porta-Play
    Scott Boehmer
  • Portable Gameplay
  • Power Play
    Shawn Surmick
  • Project: Ignition
    Jess Ragan
  • Random Access
    Eric Cohen
  • Random Access
    Scott Boehmer
  • Retro Classix
    G. Howden
  • Retrogames
    Jason Moore
  • Role Call
  • Saga
    Jon Althouse (possibly also known as Saga Force)
  • SCROLL
    Ray Burnholt
  • Sega Prime
  • Sensory Overload
    Nathan Hauke
  • Shining Forth
    Robert Schmitz (alternatively called Shining Force)
  • Shoryuken!
    Tony Fazzone
  • Slap-Dash
    Russ Perry Jr.
  • Slipstream
    Dennis Thompson
  • SNES Gaming
    Rick Wigstone
  • Spectrum
    Ara Shirinian
  • Splat!
    Eric Longdin
  • Sub-Zero
    Chris Dyer
  • Super Effects
    Janice Hrusaky
  • Super Gamer
    Eric Longdin (formerly Super NES Gamer)
  • Super NES Gamer
    Eric Longdin (became Super Gamer)
  • Super Power Bi-Monthly
    Andrew McNaughton
  • The 16-Bit Pit
    Brian Pacula
  • The 2600 Connection
    Tim Duart No. 1-50 / Russ Perry Jr. No. 51-76 / Al Backiel No. 77-100
  • The Bombadier
    Chris Johnston
  • The Consortium
    Rick Florey
  • The Dark Side
    Al Riccitelli Jr.
  • The Enigma Journal
    Matt Wensinge and ?
  • The Game Guru
    Nate Hineline
  • The Gamer's Quarter
  • The Gameroom Blitz
    Jess Ragan
  • The Gaming Edge
  • The Good, the Bad, and the 8-Bit
    Brian Pacula
  • The GURU
    Brian Goss
  • The Laser
    Mike Palisano
  • The Monitor
    George Elwell and David Weinstein ?
  • The New Video Game Trader
    Jerry Greiner
  • The Obsessed Game Fan
    Jeffrey Lee
  • The Panic Zone
    Chris Larson
  • The Portfolio Connection
    Peter and Lyn Bennett
  • The Prowler
  • The Shape of Gaming to Come
    Darren Krowlewski
  • The Subversive Sprite
    Lance Rice
  • The Videogame Trader
    Tim Duarte
  • Thy Holy Handgrenade
    Lester Walsh
  • Total Supremacy
    Jim Pittaro
  • Totally Super NES
    Andy Saito
  • Tyne & Wear
    John Matthewson
  • Ultra Bit Magazine
    Corey You
  • Uproar
    Mike Pittaro
  • V: The Video Game Experience
    Daniel Thomas as Dan Thomas McInnes
  • Vendetta
    Pat Reynolds
  • Video Apocalypse
    Josh Lesnick
  • Video Game Review
    Travis Scott
  • Video Game Revolution
    Nathan Hauke
  • Video Gaming Monthly
    Ben Leatherman
  • Video Gaming Monthly / Viewpoint
    Alex Frias
  • Video Magic
    Frank Polosky
  • Video Scope
    Aaron Buckner
  • Video Universe
    Chad Laubach and George Wilson
  • Video Universe Generation 2
    Chad Lauback
  • Video Views
    Ulrich Kempf
  • Video Vision
    Jared Jones
  • Video Wars
  • Video Zone
    Chris Kohler
  • Warpzone
    Matthew Smith
  • Wild Cat (later The Lynx)
    Phil Patton
  • Zap!
    Ter Micharoni
  • Zapp!
    Scott Weller
  • Zineophilia
    Noah Dziobecki
  • ZONG
    Yoda Zhang

Hopefully this list will come in handy to someone.

Edited by Terry93D
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Holy cow, this is AWESOME!! Thanks so much, Terry, and welcome to Retromags! :)

 

*huggles*
Areala

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Interesting!

 

Another resource might be the e-zines bundled with issues of Inside Mac Games, which were mostly Mac gaming oriented but not completely.

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Holy cow, this is AWESOME!! Thanks so much, Terry, and welcome to Retromags! :)

 

*huggles*

Areala

 

You're welcome, and no need to welcome me - I'm just HunterofBugs under a less ridiculous name. :)

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Found this the other day and thought I'd share - Chris Kohler has donated his fanzine collection of 350 issues to The Strong.

If the name rings familiar, you'll find Chris listed as the editor of Video Zone in the fanzine list above.  He eventually parlayed this into a profession with Wired and now Kotaku.  (Several fanzine editors went on to obtain careers in video game journalism or development, actually - Satoshi Tajiri (of Game Freak and Pokemon fame) probably being the most notable.)

The interview is an interesting read for anyone curious as to the video game fanzine culture of the early 90s.  And for some old-timers like myself, even a little nostalgic.  :)

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I recognize the name from his appearances on Retronauts.

Btw, I realize that physical collections and museums are valuable ways of preserving history, but all I think whenever I see these kinds of print archives is, "yeah, but who the hell is ever gonna see that stuff?"

In the long run, I think digital preservation of media of all kinds is far more essential in the dissemination of information.

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Yeah, a museum collection makes for very limited access - to be sure - but I appreciate The Strong deciding to archive these publications as part of video game history.  The video game fanzine bubble burst quickly after the Internet went mainstream but I'll always appreciate those 90s-era print 'zines.  Lots of work and love went into those things.  :)

When @Terry93D originally began compiling this list via the Digital Press forums, someone posted about a major preservation effort underway, spearheaded by Digital Press itself.  I don't think it ever went anywhere, though.  I may do some digging and see if anything ever came of it.

I've toyed with the idea of digitally preserving and sharing my own collection - which sits at around 180 issues or so - but I always find myself having reservations.  Digitally preserving history documented by paid, professional adults is one thing, but 90s fanzines were written primarily by minors.

I'd probably be more comfortable with a case-by-case approach as situations vary.  I know one former fan-ed who has granted permission for scans to be shared.  I know another who has requested certain content not be.  One former fan-ed is actively looking for his old issues long since lost.  Another fan-ed - Sean Pettibone of In Between the Lines - passed away at a young age, and frankly, is one of the primary drivers as to why I'd like to see fanzines preserved.  His 'zine was exceptional and deserves to be appreciated.

'Course, all this assumes the fan-ed would have the final word in having a 'zine preserved and shared, despite most fanzines containing content from numerous contributors.

Don't know - I'm on the fence.  Open to opinions.

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I think it's silly to try to over-analyze it, particularly whether or not it's OK to preserve fanzines based on the authors' ages. 

Preservation is preservation.  It doesn't matter if it's professionally published documents, fanzines, or mummified corpses.  So long as it has value to someone, it deserves to be preserved.

Who values amateurish fanzines?  Well, you do, apparently.  If you didn't, you would have thrown them in the garbage long ago.

That said, nearly everything we do here is illegal.  Which doesn't mean it couldn't necessarily be debated in a lengthy and expensive court battle, but copyright laws only get stronger as time goes on, and currently it stands at a minimum of 70 years after the death of the author, or else 95 years after publication for works-for-hire, meaning pretty much all mags.   I know marktrade used to come around swearing nonsense about the "transformative" nature of scans making them exempt from the law, but it just isn't any more true than saying that it's OK to take a camcorder into a theater or to transcribe the works of Stephen King by hand into lavishly illustrated manuscripts and distribute them for free. 

"Transformative uses are those that add something new, with a further purpose or different character, and do not substitute for the original use of the work. The use must be productive and must employ the quoted matter in a different manner or for a different purpose from the original."  The purpose of a mag is to be read.  So is the purpose of a scan of a mag.  The media has changed, but not the purpose.  Ripping a movie from blu-ray to .avi doesn't make the work transformative, and neither does scanning copies of magazines.  It's just copying - quite literally.  Is it easy? No. It requires a lot of effort on our part. But so did manually setting the type on a printing press back when it became necessary to implement copyright law in the first place. 

So obviously, anyone running a site like this one has to carefully consider what they're willing to post.  Looking at the original American copyright law from 1790, it lasted 14 years after date of publication.  This is pretty close to what we do, and is pretty fair, in my opinion, particularly for periodicals like magazines which aren't actually kept in print beyond their initial point of publication.  But fair doesn't mean legal, and so we take the stance of "if a publisher/rights-holder asks us to remove it, we'll take it down."

From a preservationist's point-of-view, however, copyright is irrelevant.  Will there be any copies of those fanzines in existence 70 years after the death of their authors?  Unlikely.  Without our flagrant disregard for copyright law, a lot of the stuff you see here would be lost forever, eventually.

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1 hour ago, kitsunebi77 said:

I think it's silly to try to over-analyze it, particularly whether or not it's OK to preserve fanzines based on the authors' ages. 

Personally, I think that it is OK to preserve fanzines. As you say, this is, technically speaking, wholly illegal.

However, I won't say I think the fanzines should be straight up preserved in original form. Addresses should be whited out, since these people sent the fanzines from their home. That's just the simple matter of privacy, and, also, those people may not live there any more. Likewise with telly numbers if there are any in the fanzines.

With regards to names, I don't think that matters much once you remove the address. There are probably dozens, if not hundreds, of, say, Chris Kohlers out there.

But, I suppose, if one had so many reservations about it, you could white out the last name of anyone who isn't a known media figure e.g. Chris Kohler, again (when I say "known media figure" I mean someone who is not today anonymous and whom we have confirmation did work on the fanzine), or, heck, at the very most, white-out all the last names.

Those are, I think, perfectly reasonable solutions to the matter of privacy.

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3 minutes ago, Terry93D said:

However, I won't say I think the fanzines should be straight up preserved in original form. Addresses should be whited out, since these people sent the fanzines from their home. That's just the simple matter of privacy, and, also, those people may not live there any more. Likewise with telly numbers if there are any in the fanzines.

While I don't think anyone would mind such things being whited-out, I think this might also be over-thinking things.  Presumably, if they printed their names/addresses/telephone numbers in the zine, they were OK with being contacted that way.  Granted, they probably wouldn't be expecting anyone to contact them in 2017, but it's unlikely anyone is going to be writing their address now, anyway, particularly since, as you say, they likely don't live there anymore.

A lot of magazines used to print the contact info of readers looking for pen-pals in their letters sections.  It's unlikely that they're still hoping for anyone to write them to talk about what a rad game Sonic the Hedgehog 2 is, but that doesn't mean we bother editing out those sections when we scan the mags.

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1 hour ago, kitsunebi77 said:

While I don't think anyone would mind such things being whited-out, I think this might also be over-thinking things.  Presumably, if they printed their names/addresses/telephone numbers in the zine, they were OK with being contacted that way.  Granted, they probably wouldn't be expecting anyone to contact them in 2017, but it's unlikely anyone is going to be writing their address now, anyway, particularly since, as you say, they likely don't live there anymore.

A lot of magazines used to print the contact info of readers looking for pen-pals in their letters sections.  It's unlikely that they're still hoping for anyone to write them to talk about what a rad game Sonic the Hedgehog 2 is, but that doesn't mean we bother editing out those sections when we scan the mags.

Be fair, though. Some of the fanzine editors were 13, 16. Young. Just because they were okay with it then doesn't mean they would be now.

That said, you're quite correct. Please forgive my poor wording. Take them as potential precautionary measure if the problem was to ever arise.

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