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N64 DD Coverage

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I was recently struck with an interesting theme for focusing an article on the unreleased Nintendo 64">N64 DD. I've seen several early articles covering the add-on during my search for information on other subjects but unfortunately didn't mark down the proper citation information. I was hoping that if anyone recalled a particular issue of any magazine or were to run into such coverage during their scanning you'd be able to help me out so I won't have to do so much digging and can get right into writing.

For those curious, my initial (working) idea for this article is to discuss Nintendo's failure or limited success to introduce downloadable content and Internet access nearly every gaming generation, eventually peaking with the Nintendo 64">N64 DD as their final attempt before dropping the idea altogether and skipping the GameCube. It's unfortunate that Nintendo has been struggling to make this work since nearly the beginning of the modern gaming industry despite technological and marketing barriers only to have Microsoft swoop in and finally commercialize the concept.

A related idea would to be to postulate what the current gaming scene would be like had the DD actually been completed and released, though I would likely want to have this as a separate editorial considering the unsubstantiated nature of the subject.

If anyone is interested in offering their opinion on the subject of downloadable content and Internet access as related to each system that attempted it and the gaming industry in general I would love to talk about it. Discussing my ideas with other people generally leads to an article with a much broader and informative perspective.

Anyways, thanks for the help if anyone can manage it. :)

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Let me elaborate: I'm aware the the system was released in Japan, but it was never released in the United States or UK, where early coverage had hyped it into the be-all-end-all add-on with games no other system could match. In the end the system was delayed so many times that by the time of release it was only a shadow of its former self. All of the truly groundbreaking technology that would have come with it (such as downloadable content) was not implemented fully or not implemented at all.

That's my focus: the 64DD as it should have been. From the many articles I've read on the system it's clear that the actual release was essentially nothing more than a glorified betawork.

Thanks for the link, though. I'm sure that site and community will be a big help. :D

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Thanks for the contribution. I haven't seen that particular article before, though I have read all three parts of the IGN article (yesterday, in fact).

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Oh, do you know where the other two parts of it are? I never found them... :unsure:

Hm. I looked into it again and it looks like IGN had two three-part articles on the 64DD. I believe the other two parts I read were from an earlier article covering the DD before it was canceled. Sorry man.

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You should probably hunt down this issue of Ultra Gameplayers dating to April (?) 1998. It had Gex 2 for the Nintendo 64">N64 featured on the cover, with Gex holding a 64DD disk. It had a great article on the 64 DD, listing off dozens of possible games, plus tons of screenshots.

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