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Spiro

Your favorite obscure retro video game system, and the reason/s why.

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Yeah I know, it's life's toughest question.

This means no Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft, or Sega, guys. Think outside the box.

Not going to make it a poll because there are too many obscure video game systems to count. And besides, what you or I consider "obscure", others might think of as mainstream. :lol:

So I'll start things off and give a little love to Atari's last hurrah, the Atari Jaguar.

The image issue with the Jaguar was that it was really Atari's last hurrah and last chance to get it right, and Atari simply didn't have the resources to fully execute. There was nothing wrong with the system's technology per se, but, like the 3DO, it was caught in a weird in-between phase where 2D (and sprites) was still the dominant game "format", but 3D (and polygons) was starting to be the hot "new" technology. The only system really prepared for that was the PS1.

It also naturally didn't help that, despite promises of a flurry of third party software, releases were sporadic at best and often unpolished. The 3DO had this issue to a degree, but I suspect that an easier development environment and the CD format at least enabled a more robust release schedule after a very slow start (and a start filled with too many edutainment titles).

One wonders if the Jaguar wouldn't have stood a better chance forgoing cartridges in the first place and just being a CD unit, albeit at a higher price (and this still wouldn't have positioned it any better against the PS1).

Anyway, what is it I like about the Jag?

Well for me, and I'm not the only retro gamer/enthusiast that thinks like this,

I really like 2D games, and I really like arcade titles, and the combination of a TON of the Jaguar's library synchs with me perfectly. I love the 2D games like Zool 2, Ultra Vortek and Rayman. I love the arcade titles like Tempest 2000 and Missile Command 3D. And I love the cross between the two with titles like Zoop, NBA Jam TE, Raiden, Defender 2000, Protector, Protector SE, Power Drive Rally, Super Burnout, Breakout 2000, and a couple others. Something about all of those titles just really clicks with me.

I also really liked the early 3D game concepts. Things like Club Drive, I-War and Cybermorph I found a lot of pleasure in, while I don't find the same sort of pleasure in early PS1 titles.

So, in my opinion, the Jaguar is NOT a bad console. It's library isn't that big, but there is a very good number of titles that I do really appreciate on this system. Yeah, the controller doesn't work for everyone, and there were some colossal busts like Checkered Flag and Fight For Life, and I can totally understand why games like Club Drive, I-War and Cybermorph are not everyone's cups of tea. But, that doesn't mean that the system as a whole doesn't hold much appeal. For me at least, it does.

I see this board as a whole has very few active forumites, but it would be interesting to read the thoughts of those that might take the time to contribute to this thread.

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I am going to have to go with the Vectrex.

Released in 1982 this vector graphic based machine didn't fare too well in the over-saturated gaming market of the time. Still many old school gamers and collectors have felt the draw of the recognizable hum that comes when you turn the dial and watch the screen slowly light up. That's right. for those of you conceived at a Backstreet Boys concert, this console had it's own screen. It was essential the first iCade. But really it is much more than that. The Vectrex isn't some novelty from a by gone era. If it was do you think that it would have such a devoted home-brew community The Vectrex has more home-brew titles than official releases. This is probably because a Vectrex truly is something special. Back when TV was new, and sets were just small boxes made of wood, a child could sit a foot away and get lost in another world. Vectrex brings that feeling back. Maybe because it has the allure of being a self contained unit, or because the truly awesome things that programmers can do with vector graphics. But one thing is for sure, The Vectrex is something special. Sure it doesn't have color and you have to use those hard to find overlays. Sure the button layout on the controller may not be the most comfortable or imaginative But if you want a unique gaming experience you should hunt down one of these boxy beauties for yourself. The best thing, most of them still work perfect thirty years later.

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I am going to have to go with the Vectrex.

Released in 1982 this vector graphic based machine didn't fare too well in the over-saturated gaming market of the time. Still many old school gamers and collectors have felt the draw of the recognizable hum that comes when you turn the dial and watch the screen slowly light up. That's right. for those of you conceived at a Backstreet Boys concert, this console had it's own screen. It was essential the first iCade. But really it is much more than that. The Vectrex isn't some novelty from a by gone era. If it was do you think that it would have such a devoted home-brew community The Vectrex has more home-brew titles than official releases. This is probably because a Vectrex truly is something special. Back when TV was new, and sets were just small boxes made of wood, a child could sit a foot away and get lost in another world. Vectrex brings that feeling back. Maybe because it has the allure of being a self contained unit, or because the truly awesome things that programmers can do with vector graphics. But one thing is for sure, The Vectrex is something special. Sure it doesn't have color and you have to use those hard to find overlays. Sure the button layout on the controller may not be the most comfortable or imaginative But if you want a unique gaming experience you should hunt down one of these boxy beauties for yourself. The best thing, most of them still work perfect thirty years later.

That's what I was going to mention also. Even though I was around when this system was out, I didn't really know about it until relatively recently. I've got one and much of the official releases (including the 3D Viewer ones) but am still looking for a decent deal on a complete-in-box Light Pen when I have more money to spare.

Too bad the market crash of '83 killed the system before it really had a chance. Vector/polygon graphics were set behind by at least 10 years after this, until the first affordable 3D accelertor cards came along for PCs (though they are admittedly still outputting raster instead of vector signals) and flash vector animation came along in the late 90s.

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Wow. I really have to give you guys props for mentioning the Vectrex, and I am in the same boat (though I have to give honarary mention to the Intellivison and the Neo Geo Pocket--both had games that were way beyond their competitors).

The vextrex was really special. You still cannot get games EXACTLY like they were with the original vectrex, and the smooth movement of the graphics still can't REALLY be matched without firing a light beam at the screen. The games were not too shabby either, and some of them were surprisingly complex for the time period. If you look at the animation, sense of humor, and graphics of Spike! for the Vectrex--man...way ahead of most games at the time period.

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If we have to completely disregard anything ever made by Nintendo and Sega, then I have to give my second choice, which is the Neo-Geo.

I never owned this thing, but growing up I had one friend from a relatively well-to-do family who got one as a gift one year. We played the begeezus out of it, especially Crossed Swords, Fatal Fury, Nam-1975 and Super Spy. Great games, great system, priced WAAAAY out of my tax bracket. Doomed to fail? Almost certainly. Cool as hell? Best be believing.

If I'm allowed to pick one obscure retro system that is made by Sega though, then I'll state my #1 choice, which is hands down the Sega Nomad. The Nomad is nothing more than a completely portable Genesis/Megadrive system that ate batteries the way Pac-Man consumes dots (a full set of six AA batteries got you roughly two hours of playtime). You had to have the AC adapter or rechargeable battery pack to play this thing for any length of time, but it's got TV outs, six button setup and a plug-in spot for a second controller, so you can use it as a full-fledged Genesis if you want to.

Love my Nomad. :)

*huggles*

Areala

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You know, I wonder how the Nomad would have fared if it has today's rechargeable batteries. Someone should make something like that.

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If we have to completely disregard anything ever made by Nintendo and Sega, then I have to give my second choice, which is the Neo-Geo.

I never owned this thing, but growing up I had one friend from a relatively well-to-do family who got one as a gift one year. We played the begeezus out of it, especially Crossed Swords, Fatal Fury, Nam-1975 and Super Spy. Great games, great system, priced WAAAAY out of my tax bracket. Doomed to fail? Almost certainly. Cool as hell? Best be believing.

If I'm allowed to pick one obscure retro system that is made by Sega though, then I'll state my #1 choice, which is hands down the Sega Nomad. The Nomad is nothing more than a completely portable Genesis/Megadrive system that ate batteries the way Pac-Man consumes dots (a full set of six AA batteries got you roughly two hours of playtime). You had to have the AC adapter or rechargeable battery pack to play this thing for any length of time, but it's got TV outs, six button setup and a plug-in spot for a second controller, so you can use it as a full-fledged Genesis if you want to.

Love my Nomad. smile.png

*huggles*

Areala

I was not sure if Neo-Geo could be considered obscure, but it was the first one to pop in to my mind as well. A system that has lived through the changing of many hands and outlasted the lifespan of most consoles, yet has a very small library of games compared to other consoles that lasted a much shorter amount of time. As a matter of fact last night I just Ultra Modded my AES.

Out of all the systems over the years the Neo and the TG16.

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For me, the Sega Nomad. I never owned one, but my cousin had one and when we went on roadtrips, I'd bring all my Sega games and he'd let me play the crap out of that thing. I would have given anything if I could have gotten one for my own.

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well guys i think for me id have to say the Amiga CD32 WHY you ask

because it was only released in canada and i remember it being great compared to my nes at the time cd sound is what i think got me

its a rare one one that i dont have in my huge collection id love one!!! but unfortunately cant find one :(

battletoad was cool on it!!!! the sound i mean LOL

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