All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. contains reprints of stories from Sonic the Hedgehog #252-#256
  3. Sonic Select Book 09

    contains reprints of stories from the Archie Comics' various Sonic-related video game adaptations and tie-in stories
  4. Sonic Select Book 08

    contains reprints of stories from the entire Tails miniseries and other related stories from Sonic Triple Trouble, and Sonic the Hedgehog #28, 29, 149 and 150.
  5. Sonic Select Book 07

    contains reprints of stories from the entire Princess Sally miniseries, Sonic the Hedgehog #20 and #222, and Knuckles the Echidna #29
  6. Yesterday
  7. Sonic Select Book 06

    Contains reprints of stories from the entire Sonic Quest miniseries, Sonic Free Comic Book Day 2010-2011, and Sonic the Hedgehog #224
  8. Sonic Select Book 05

    This volume contains reprints of stories from Sonic Super Special #5, #8, #9 and #11, and Sonic Blast.
  9. Solicited, but ultimately canceled before being released, this volume would have contained reprints of stories from Knuckles the Echidna #28-#32
  10. Solicited, but ultimately canceled before being released, this volume would have contained reprints of stories from Knuckles the Echidna #22-#27
  11. kitsunebi77's random stuff

    To be fair, they're different types of lists. The USA list is simply a sales chart for what was probably a two-week period in late January 1987. The Japanese list is the top ten best games of the year as voted on by Famitsu readers. Also, I don't think they were hating on Tyson, just theorizing that it's sales were as strong as they were because of his name recognition. They actually name Punch-Out!! as their sports game of the year in this same issue. You make an interesting point, though. Although every single game on the USA sales chart is a Japanese game, the variety is greater than what Japanese gamers appear to be drawn to. This relates perfectly to a point I was trying to make in another thread, which is that the USA can cherry pick the best and most interesting Japanese releases. Admittedly there are a few (emphasis on the "few") gems that never make it stateside, but the rest of the 75% of Japanese games that aren't picked up for release in the USA are usually avoided because they're uninspired clones or outright terrible games (or games of zero interest to non-Japanese gamers, such as mahjong). So looking at Japanese games from a strictly American point of view might give one an unrealistically high opinion of the level of quality and originality in games being churned out in Japan. Of course, during the 8-bit era, there really weren't any quality games created in the West, since serious game designers couldn't be bothered with consoles. Thanks to the awful Western console games of the 8/16 bit era, the opinion that all Western games are garbage is still held by some in Japan to this day. Anyway, there were a lot of copycat games in Japan, and while some of it was due to laziness or developers trying to cash in on someone else's success, some of it was because that was what Japanese gamers wanted.
  12. kitsunebi77's random stuff

    yikes, that list! but yes, let's hate on USA liking Mike Tyson's Punch-Out!! the USA list actually has a lot more variety as far as publishers, genre, and franchises. Pretty neat to think about. you're doing excellent work, kitsunebi!
  13. Last week
  14. Knuckles the Echidna Archives Volume 4

    contains reprints of stories from Knuckles the Echidna #16-#21
  15. Knuckles the Echidna Archives Volume 3

    contains reprints of stories from Knuckles the Echidna #10-#15
  16. Knuckles the Echidna Archives Volume 2

    contains reprints of stories from Knuckles the Echidna #4-#9
  17. Knuckles the Echidna Archives Volume 1

    Contains reprints of stories from the Knuckles miniseries and Knuckles the Echidna #1-#3
  18. kitsunebi77's random stuff

    It'll be a while yet till I get the whole mag finished, but I thought this was interesting enough to post here. This is the reader's choice for the Top 10 Famicom games of 1987: Dragon Quest II (yeah, big surprise there. The only time a Dragon Quest game isn't at the top of the charts in Japan is if there wasn't a DQ game released that year) Pro Yakyuu Family Stadium (released in the USA as RBI Baseball) Hokkaidō Rensa Satsujin: Okhotsk ni Kiyu (a Japanese-style 1st-person menu-driven graphic adventure designed by the same guy who did Dragon Quest) Pro Yakyuu Family Stadium '87 (proving that Madden wasn't the first to offer annual updates, this is the exact same game as #2, but with more teams and updated rosters) Moero!! Pro Yakyuu (released in the USA as Bases Loaded) Link no Bouken (released in the USA as Zelda II: The Adventure of Link) Digital Devil Story Megami Tensei (the first in what would become a sprawling franchise of different series like Shin Megami Tensei and Persona, this one is a hard-as-nails first-person dungeon-crawl RPG) Shin Onigashima (a menu-driven graphic adventure for the Famicom Disk System) Momotarou Densetsu (a Dragon Quest clone from Hudson, the first in a series) Sanma no Meitantei (a 1st-person menu-driven graphic adventure starring Japanese TV personality Sanma Akashiya) So there you have it. The people of Japan have spoken. The best games of 1987: 3 baseball games (two of which are essentially the same game) 3 menu-driven adventure games (very few of this type were made in the West. Think Shadowgate or Deja Vu) 3 RPGs (one of which is a DQ game and one of which looks and plays exactly like a DQ game) Zelda II (fight amongst yourselves as to what genre it belongs to)
  1. Load more activity