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  1. 11 points

    Version 1.0.0

    158 downloads

    Game Players Issue 084 (May 1996) With reviews of such acclaimed classics as Creature Shock, Cyberdillo, and The Raven Project, this issue of Game Players is a big ol' slice of nostalgia pie for the 90s kid in all of us. I kid of course, The Raven Project is next issue. (Seriously though, this issue reviews Worms, Earthworm Jim 2, and Super Mario RPG and previews Tomb Raider, Turok: the Dinosaur Hunter, and Final Fantasy VII).
  2. 7 points

    Version 1.0.0

    56 downloads

    "Monthly magazine for Game Freaks." Game Geeks also welcome. Game Squares need not apply.
  3. 7 points

    Version 1.0.0

    115 downloads

    A Mortal Kombat II kollector's magazine produced by Electronic Gaming Monthly, the second of a four issue series. Released November 1994.
  4. 7 points

    Version 1.1.0

    124 downloads

    A Mortal Kombat II kollector's magazine produced by Electronic Gaming Monthly, the first of a four issue series. Released November 1994.
  5. 7 points

    Version 1.0.0

    132 downloads

    Official U.S. Playstation Magazine Issue 29 February 2000
  6. 6 points

    Version 1.0.0

    57 downloads

    Computer Gaming World Issue 163 (February 1998)
  7. 6 points

    Version 1.0.0

    116 downloads

    Electronic Gaming Monthly Issue 103 (February 1998)
  8. 6 points

    Version 1.0.0

    44 downloads

    Compute! Issue 064 Vol. 7 No.9 (September 1985)
  9. 6 points

    Version 1.0.0

    103 downloads

    Computer Game Review and CD-ROM Entertainment Volume 2 Issue 01 (August 1992)
  10. 6 points

    Version 1.0.0

    66 downloads

    Far East of Eden (Tengai Makyou): Fuun Kabukiden is an RPG for the PC Engine CD released by Hudson Soft on July 10, 1993.
  11. 6 points

    Version 1.0.0

    52 downloads

    40 pgs
  12. 6 points

    Version 1.0.0

    51 downloads

    40 pgs
  13. 5 points
    After months of behind-the-scenes deliberation, infused with a ridiculous amount of name-calling, indian leg wrestling, and wedgies, the administrators have reached their conclusion and are now ready to share it with the rest of the community. Presenting: RETRO MAGS! Ruminate with us for a bit. You'll notice that nowhere on the site does it specifically state we are set up to only scan and host old magazines about computers and video games, and every so often we'll receive a request from a user inquiring about whether or not we handle this or that sort of publication, or help finding out-of-print periodicals of various sorts. Fishing magazines. Car magazines. Science magazines. There's a magazine for everything, and if there isn't now, then there probably was in decades past. It's true! Literally starting today, Retromags is going to become your one-stop shop for everything related to old school magazines. Hobbyist publications, consumer reference, news and entertainment...it's all coming both soon and now. Just think: your dad may finally track down that issue of Organic Gardner he read as a lad! Your grandmother may thrill to a digital version of the doll collector's monthly she subscribed to twenty years ago! Those classic 80's knitting patterns? They're going to be here too! Vintage Wrestling quarterlies, 1960's era Hot Rod publications, celebrity gossip rags from back when the hair, the shoulder pads, and the feuds were larger than life? Forget download limits. These files are big, beautiful, and cleaned up to current-year specs as best that we (and Photoshop) can accomplish. To prove we aren't kidding, we've got a handful of brand new releases we've been holding back on for this very announcement. Only you guys could make it possible, with your contributions of time, energy, and cold, hard cash. Especially that last part. Thank you, anonymous donor who wishes to remain anonymous for that sudden infusion back in February. Obviously this is going to require a bit of a site overhaul. Expect to see some serious changes to the way things like the databases are structured as we get things in line with the new, expanded concept. We're aiming to add roughly a dozen different categories per week, then new sub-categories within them similar to the way the gaming magazines are currently broken down by area of release, then name of publication. It's a lot of work, and not something which can be done all at once, but we're going to push on as best we can. Limited site downtime and outages may occur infrequently as we make these changes. The forum software is robust, but we're going to be subjecting it to an awful lot of stretching in directions we aren't sure Invision means for it to stretch. Errors may crop up here and there, and if so, we hope you'll be patient with us. If it all goes as planned, these relics of yester-year will be hosted, preserved forever for future generations to marvel and laugh at. We spared no expense scouring the seedy underbellies of auction sites, hunting for the weirdest, tackiest, most off-beat examples we could find to show we mean business when we say, "At Retromags, we scan it all!" Sincerely - Phillyman, E-Day, Areala, and the rest of the Retromags staff!
  14. 5 points

    Version 1.0.0

    43 downloads

    Compute! Issue 039 Vol. 5 No. 8 (August 1983)
  15. 5 points

    Version 1.0.0

    86 downloads

    A Mortal Kombat II kollector's magazine produced by Electronic Gaming Monthly, the third of a four issue series. Released January 1995.
  16. 5 points

    Version 1.1.0

    93 downloads

    A Mortal Kombat II kollector's magazine produced by Electronic Gaming Monthly, the fourth of a four issue series. Released February 1995.
  17. 5 points

    Version 1.0.0

    97 downloads

    A complete guide with moves, codes, and fatalities for MK, MKII, and MK3.
  18. 5 points

    Version 1.0.0

    142 downloads

    Nintendo Game Cube Guide
  19. 5 points

    Version 1.0.0

    59 downloads

    40 pgs
  20. 5 points

    Version 1.0.0

    136 downloads

    S.W.A.T.Pro Issue 25 (September 1995)
  21. 4 points
    So it begins, I gave my first shot at scanning something. I opted for 600 dpi because why not :). Jpgs shouldn't be compressed. Let me have your impressions. https://drive.google.com/open?id=1slyRLhCIBSCxvdxac3SW48Phkjk_JhEC I'm using the scansnap utility and it looks like it generates pdf and then extract the pages as single images. Is there any option to make it output jpgs natively? Later I'll upload it to archive.org and from there anyone would be allowed to edit/reupload it as they please
  22. 4 points

    Version 1.0.0

    81 downloads

    Official Final Fantasy VII Strategy Guide
  23. 4 points

    Version 1.0.0

    32 downloads

    Edited for your pleasure and convenience. For the raw 600dpi source files, please visit https://archive.org/details/@japanesemagazinesscanproject *PLEASE NOTE: Gamest is printed in right-to-left Japanese reading style. If viewing two pages at a time, you will need to set your CBR reader to Japanese mode so that the pages will display in the correct order. I have moved the survey postcards to the end of the archive, since they interfered with the correct display of the pages when using two-page viewing mode.
  24. 4 points

    Version 1.0.0

    45 downloads

    This file has been edited and saved at a constant height of 2700px. For the unedited 600dpi source file, please visit https://archive.org/details/@japanesemagazinesscanproject *PLEASE NOTE: Gamest is printed in right-to-left Japanese reading style. If viewing two pages at a time, you will need to set your CBR reader to Japanese mode so that the pages will display in the correct order.
  25. 4 points

    Version 1.0.0

    46 downloads

    This file has been edited and saved at a constant height of 2700px. For the raw 600dpi source file, please visit https://archive.org/details/@japanesemagazinesscanproject *PLEASE NOTE: Gamest is printed in right-to-left Japanese reading style. If viewing two pages at a time, you will need to set your CBR reader to Japanese mode so that the pages will display in the correct order.
  26. 4 points

    Version 1.0.0

    47 downloads

    This file has been edited and saved at a constant height of 2700px. For the raw 600dpi source file, please visit https://archive.org/details/@japanesemagazinesscanproject *PLEASE NOTE: Gamest is printed in right-to-left Japanese reading style. If viewing two pages at a time, you will need to set your CBR reader to Japanese mode so that the pages will display in the correct order.
  27. 4 points

    Version 1.0.0

    27 downloads

    Compute! Issue 058 Vol. 7 No.3 (March 1985)
  28. 4 points
    Here are two guides for Wizardry Gaiden II: Curse of the Ancient Emperor - an RPG for the Game Boy exclusive to Japan. https://archive.org/details/WizardryGaidenIINoSubete https://archive.org/details/WizardryGaidenIIHisshouKouryakuHou
  29. 4 points

    Version 1.0.0

    41 downloads

    Compute! Issue 042 Vol. 5 No 11 (November 1983)
  30. 4 points

    Version 1.0.0

    67 downloads

    Last Armageddon is a post-apocalyptic RPG developed and published by BrainGrey for the PC Engine CD on August 31, 1990.
  31. 3 points
    So last month members here were extremely generous and donated enough money for me to get a Fujitsu ix1500. Getting that scanner resulted in CivicMinded sending me around 950 magazines and guides to scan at great expense. Now THAT has caused something else. Last week, seeing the insane magazine donation, Hardcorehubz asked if I was open to selling the ix1500 in order to get the Fujitsu FI-7160, with him covering the difference. That's an obvious decision to make. So the Fujitsu has been returned, Hardcorehubz has sent the money to me, and the 7160 is getting ordered tonight. It's a heavier duty scanner that can take more pages and is made for heavier workloads, so it should serve me and this site very well. So with that and a heavy duty paper cutter, getting through the CivicMinded magazines will be pretty easy. Now who wants to help edit?
  32. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    22 downloads

    Compute! Issue 077 Vol. 8 No. 10 (October 1986)
  33. 3 points
    Whew. The wait is finally over and I can come clean. You guys remember when I disappeared for a month a little while back? I tried to cover it up with an explanation of burnout, but the truth was...I was working with Phillyman full-time behind the scenes to make sure the rollout of RETRO MAGS would be truly special. For one entire month, I spent every spare minute scanning and editing a beautiful run of pristine condition issues of Cat Fancy which will be uploaded with the launch of the new site. Hold onto your whiskers, kids! They'll be coming your way soon!
  34. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    24 downloads

    Compute! Issue 065 Vol. 7 No.10 (October 1985)
  35. 3 points
    Archive.org hasn't derived my files in over 48 hours. What a #$%^ website... So the previews aren't working, but I'm not going to wait for the "up to a week" that their upload process takes to complete. The cbr can still be downloaded regardless. Anyway, here's an artbook for the first 5 games in the Can Can Bunny series of games. These are adult games for Japanese computers, but a couple of them ended up on the Sega Saturn in edited form. https://archive.org/details/CanCanBunnyOfficialArtBook
  36. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    21 downloads

    Compute! Issue 062 Vol. 7 No.7 (July 1985)
  37. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    22 downloads

    Compute! Issue 061 Vol. 7 No.6 (June 1985)
  38. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    23 downloads

    Compute! Issue 060 Vol. 7 No.5 (May 1985)
  39. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    22 downloads

    Compute! Issue 059 Vol. 7 No.4 (April 1985)
  40. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    28 downloads

    Compute! Issue 055 Vol. 6 No. 12 (December 1984)
  41. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    30 downloads

    Compute! Issue 052 Vol. 6 No. 9 (September 1984)
  42. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    39 downloads

    Compute! Issue 050 Vol. 6 No. 7 (July 1984)
  43. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    31 downloads

    Compute! Issue 049 Vol. 6 No. 6 (June 1984)
  44. 3 points
    Realizing I haven't posted a blog entry in well over a year is kind of becoming an annual event here in my Retromags world. I'm not as active as I should be, as I'd like to be, and much as I wish I could promise to change all of that, I don't make promises I can't be certain of keeping. One of the most recent things I blogged about was the question of what happens when one's desire to keep up with gaming flounders, and as it turns out, there's still no cut-and-dried answer to that. Playing video games used to be my go-to hobby, something I maintained with an excessive interest. I followed up on new systems, stalked new releases, anticipated new console systems, read magazines and books and really anything I could get my hands on that would tell me more about my favorite hobby. Now? Well, now I'm a woman in her early forties for whom gaming is still exciting, but only in the familiar sense. I am a "gamer" only insofar as I own video game systems and will occasionally turn one of them on to play for a bit. An hour or so of "Dragon's Crown" here, a two hour stint with "Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance" there, and the occasional play-through of an RPG from the 16-bit era that brings back all the memories of what being a gamer in the 90's meant: lines at arcades for Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat machines, the console wars, EGM vs. GamePro vs. GameFan, and so forth. I'm more interested in what was than what is or what will be. In other words, I'm clinging to a past which recedes further away from me with each passing day, and in the worry that one day I will have only memories to occupy my thoughts, I'm struggling to pack my banks full of all the good ones. The best ones. The ones that made me who I am today. I'm also feeling the same way about a lot of other things in my life, especially music. Music hasn't always been enormously important in my life, but once I realized what it was, what it could do, and how much fun it was to make it, I've been obsessed with it. Not obsessed in the way that, say, a vinyl collector will obsess over finding a perfect-condition LP, but rather obsessed with it in the sense that I use it as a landmark, to recall feelings and put me back in the frame of mind I was in when something happened. "How does that relate to gaming, Areala?" I'm getting to that. Be patient. Welsh singer Donna Lewis released her first album, "Now In A Minute" in May of 1996. If those names don't mean anything to you, then maybe the title of her hit single will: "I Love You Always, Forever" was the most-played, most-requested song on pop radio stations the year of its release. If you lived ANYWHERE within earshot of the FM band, you heard this song. Maybe you hated it, maybe you loved it, maybe you were indifferent to it, but I fell into the second camp. Her voice mesmerized me with its breathy, ethereal qualities. To this day, it conjures up memories of the summer between my Freshman and Sophomore years of college, where I spent a lot of time back at home and travelling with my mom and my brother to visit relatives. He'd just graduated high school, after all, so everyone was eager to lavish attention on him before he moved off to college. One of the things I loved to do back in my high school and college days, as far as video games were concerned, was get online and play one of the text-based Multi-User Dungeons, or MUDs, that you could find all over the place before "Everquest" and later "World of Warcraft" pretty much wiped them out. MUDs were free, online, open-world games that used an Infocom-style parser to input commands. The difference between a MUD and a normal text adventure was that when you quit playing "Zork", everything about the world stopped because you were the only denizen. A MUD, on the other hand, was always on (except during server upgrades or maintenance periods), and open to multiple players at all hours of the day and night. I spent a considerable amount of time in college, and even afterwards, MUDding. Most MUDs didn't have sound, and the ones that did used it for very small things, like a quick MIDI tune when you accessed their login screen, or a few bloops and beeps when you gained a level or died. Therefore, while MUDding, I often would put in my headphones and listen to a CD. And that summer, it was Donna Lewis more than any other band which dominated my listening time when I got online to interact with my friends. While "I Love You Always, Forever" is a catchy pop tune, and is the obvious choice for a hit radio single, I've always felt there were much stronger songs on the album than that one. If I had to pick a favorite, it wouldn't be that one. I love every track on the album, but the one which always stood out to me, mainly because of my background as a gamer and love of fantasy role-playing, was "Agenais." Much of the meaning of Donna's music is left up to your own interpretation, but this is clearly based on an idea or a dream she once had, perhaps a story she read that fired up her imagination. It's the closest I think I've ever come to closing my eyes and believing, honestly BELIEVING in my heart, that I truly was somewhere else. "Agenais" was every special area of every MUD I ever played on, where other people just like me came to congregate, tell stories, and live separate virtual lives unencumbered by the weight of reality and released to realize our fantasies. It truly was, in Donna's words, a "beautiful, magical place". What always fascinated me about the story she relates within the lyrics, however, is how one arrives at Agenais. You don't go soaring up into the clouds, you don't climb a mountain, you don't jump on a rocket ship and blast off to a different planet or sail across the sea to a new continent, or walk into the trunk of an enchanted oak tree. You float. To reach Agenais, you float to a golden crystal palace, lit by blue flames, where dancers twirl, wearing long, silver veils and white lilies woven into their air. You reach Agenais by closing your eyes and floating down. Like you were in a dream. Lewis's song is fairly basic, but infused with so much imagination that I've been in love with it for twenty-plus years. MUDding, for me, was floating down to Agenais. What else could it be, with carefully-crafted underwater cities, treetop mansions, dragon lairs, and all manner of pixies, fairies, goblins, elves, dwarves, wizards, halflings, gnomes, warriors, clerics, angels, thieves, bards, and all the rest? Lewis's final, whispered refrain, the minor-key musical notes accompanying it, have always carried an air of finality for me. As we get older, the fantasies of our youth become harder and harder to hold on to. Other things in life take priority, and many of our hopes and aspirations are put on hold while other things happen. In "Agenais", however, I have a four-minute remembrance of good times past. I link it to friendships made across thousands of miles. I link it to sleepy car rides back to Indianapolis late in the evening. I link it to my virtual persona, who now slumbers away in the database of some disconnected server, a collection of bits and bytes which, like all of us, slowly decay as the years go by. All that is left of her now is my memory, and the memories of those who knew her. In a hundred years' time, it will matter to no one that once, "Areala" existed in a realm called "Land of the Lost Unicorn", in the guise of a pixie cleric who followed the tenets of Moradin's True Neutrality in an effort to bring balance to the land. The people she met, the friends she made, the adventures she had, the enemies she fought, the puzzles she solved, the gear she obtained, the lives she touched, will not matter. She, in a sense, has already gone "floating down to Agenais". It's a somber thought. But not a bad one. Because, though the life of "Areala, Priestess of Moradin, wife of Carla, antagonist of Cougar, friend of Aspenamy, compatriot of Quenthel, nemesis of Belial, and Mayor of Lost Unicorn Village" may one day be meaningless to everyone else, it will have had value to me. And one day, hopefully later rather than sooner, when I myself find myself floating down to Agenais, I will carry that memory and many others with me into that labyrinth of golden rose-red colours. I'll have Donna Lewis, and music, and video games, to thank for that. And people like you who visit Retromags and help keep the retro dream alive for the rest of us who all have our own private visions, our own personal Agenaises, our own unknowable memories of what gaming meant. Thanks for reading. I'm heading to bed. *huggles* Areala
  45. 3 points
    Welcome Phillyman's 100 March 2019 Scans! These will be scans 102 thru 201 I tried to keep them to packs of 10, but threw in some fillers where I couldn't find a tenth magazine.
  46. 3 points
    A taste of the next 100 magazines to be scanned (50 out of 100)...more details this weekend
  47. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    61 downloads

    This guide covers the first two games in the SD Gundam: Gachapon Senshi series of strategy games from Bandai. SD Gundam World: Gachapon Senshi - Scramble Wars was released for the Famicom in November 1987. SD Gundam World: Gachapon Senshi 2 - Capsule Senki was released for the Famicom June 25, 1989. PLEASE NOTE: This guide is printed Japanese style (from left to right), so if you are viewing two pages at a time, you will need to set your CBR reader to "Japanese mode" so that the pages will be displayed in the correct order. If you are viewing a single page at a time this will not be necessary.
  48. 3 points
    Retromags Presents! Official U.S. Playstation Magazine February 2000  Database Entry! Download Directly! Thanks to Phillyman for scanning this issue (and to me for editing it!)
  49. 3 points

    Version 1.0.0

    61 downloads

    スーパーチャイニーズ2-ドラゴンキッド攻略の奥義書 (Super Chinese 2: Dragon Kid - Strategy Mission Statement) is a supplement to issue 80 of Family Computer Magazine (June 2, 1989). Super Chinese 2 (released in the USA as Little Ninja Brothers) is an action RPG developed and published by Culture Brain for the Famicom. PLEASE NOTE: This guide is printed Japanese-style, meaning it is read from right to left. In order for the pages to align correctly when viewing two pages at a time, your CBR reader must be set to Japanese mode.
  50. 3 points
    Just uploaded Gamest issue 64 (October 1991) (a special edition issue exclusively about Street Fighter II) to my "found magazines" pile at the Internet Archive. You can download it here: https://archive.org/details/GamestIssue064StreetFighterIISpecialEditionOctober1991