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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/21/2019 in Posts

  1. 3 points
    Retromags Presents! GamePro's Handheld Video Games Issue 1 (Spring 1991) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: E-Day    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  2. 2 points
    Retromags Presents! Game Player's Strategy Guide to Nintendo Games Volume 2 Number 3 (June-July 1989) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: E-Day    Uploaded By: E-Day    Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  3. 2 points
    That's the one. Phillyman sent it to me this summer with a bunch of Swatpro issues and some other odds and ends.
  4. 2 points
    Thanks! The second issue will be coming at some point. It's been scanned, and just waiting for me to edit it.
  5. 2 points
    Retromags Presents! Game Players Nintendo Guide Volume 5 Number 8 (August 1992) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: E-Day    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  6. 2 points
    I have personally scanned over a thousand magazines and I still have a couple of thousand more in my basement waiting for their day on the scanner. I have bought magazines since I was a teen when computers first appeared so my collection ranges from early issues of CVG onward. Additionally, since I created OGM I have purchased hundreds of mags on the local auction sites specifically because they have not been scanned at all (PC Gamer (UK), PC World (NZ) etc). Physical donations are negligible due to shipping costs to send content to NZ or Australia where we have active scanning members. As stated above, OGM does have a small contingent of scanning members who contribute, some regularly and others randomly. Some scans are great, some not, but all are either not scanned previously or are currently available in better quality on the site than those released previously in the past. Having turned 57 today my desire is to get unreleased content available while I am able to, and if that means a little less editing to get more magazines released then so be it. I simply do not have the time or inclination to spends dozens of hours editing a single title like Meppi does as my collection is far too big to work on that basis if I want to get them all scanned before I no longer able to. As far as members signing up goes, I get a LOT of registrations and maybe one person out of fifty donates to gain access while the other forty nine don't and subsequently get deleted. You are correct, sod all people understand and contribute. Most everyone wants everything for nothing. It's sad times we live in. Of the 140 members of the site probably only a handful came from Retromags so the 15000 you have here are pretty much all leechers too if you were to look at the donations vs members ratio. You have so many simply because no membership donation is required although in truth people from the USA are clouded by GamePro, EGM and Nintendo Power and have little interest in non-USA content so it's likely you have a higher hit rate of donators here anyway.
  7. 2 points
    Retromags Presents! Electronic Gaming Monthly Issue 183 (October 2004) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: E-Day    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: Cryomancer Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  8. 2 points
    Newest upload [10/23/2019] https://archive.org/details/msxsoftwarecatalog1989 I saw catalogs for some of the other years, but not for 1989. So here you go.
  9. 2 points
    Sorry, I wasn't clear. By default, ScanSnap paper size is set to "automatic detection." This is actually autocrop. By manually selecting a paper size, you are turning autocrop off. If you select a size larger than the page you're scanning, it will ensure that you're scanning every part of the page. Unless my calculations are incorrect, if you scan two issues of Famitsu per week, you could be caught up in around 22 years. And then you could die with a tombstone engraved with "He wasted his life. What was he thinking???"
  10. 1 point
    I see where you're both coming from but... none of us are the rightly owner of any of this stuff.
  11. 1 point
    That asshat picks up all kinds of stuff and runs with it. Pretty much always without asking permission. He's posted lots of my scans over there against my will and there's nothing I can do about it. He once nearly got Retromags into legal trouble by posting a collection of around 150 of our files to the Internet Archive and drawing the attention of the media (and lawyers), forcing us to temporarily remove those same files from our site - downloads which to this day have to remain hidden from anyone not logged in as a member. And I imagine one day, Jason Scott will single-handedly be the reason that @KiwiArcader will be forced to turn Oldgamemags into a completely closed community for scanners only when he posts all of their stuff against Kiwi's explicit wishes. So not a fan, basically.
  12. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! GamePro Issue 241 (October 2008) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: Melki    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  13. 1 point
    I kinda want to see how modern commercial Japanese OCR solutions deal with this kind of data. A quick search shows the leading products are Panasonic's 読取革命, NTT's eTypist and Sourcenext's 本格読取 (which uses Panasonic's engine). Prices range from about $50 to about $100, and they all promise modern intelligent OCR (i.e. one that uses some linguistic AI in addition to pure optics) as well as intelligent understanding of layout. The first two have demo versions available for download, but they're Windows only so I'll have to wait until I'm home to try them. In the meantime, I remembered app Google Translate has a manual OCR scanning mode where you can take a photo and help the engine by painting over sections of text. I tried it on the same Famitsu review from the other thread, super zoomed-in on my laptop screen. The OCR results are flawless. Sure, this is a very short text and it's fairly clear, but still, it's impressive.
  14. 1 point
    I am. If we're dealing with a constantly evolving translation model, it makes sense that newer versions aren't immediately available on all the servers. Nothing on this scale works that way, and we'll probably see changes that appear in one server propagated to the rest in a matter of hours. I think that when serious research is involved, nothing is of no importance. Ad copy (especially when it's not presented as an actual ad) tells us how a company tries to present a work. You can tell a lot about particular corporate cultures and even about game development by seriously taking a look at them. There's really not a single word in those magazines that can't be used in some capacity when researching aspects of game culture at that point in time.
  15. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! Updated Release of GamePro Issue 103 (April 1997) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day Edited By: Melki Uploaded By: E-Day Donated By: CIVICMINDED
  16. 1 point
    Google Translate has shown incredible progress in the last few years, but one of the problems that comes with that progress is that it can be deceiving. Depending on the text, Google Translate now can output text that's perfectly formed and mostly accurate, but then completely fails to translate one small part of it in a way that's not apparent (I've seen it even convey the opposite meaning of what was said in the original). If you rely on it for research purposes that's not good enough no matter how accurate the rest of the translation is. Even when the entire translation is pretty good, as is in your example, the few small glitches can cause confusion. For example, 役 was translated here as its common meaning of "role" instead of "(card game) hand", and if you don't know what kind of game Hanafuda is you might be led to think there's some unexplained role system here. Then there's the fact that Google Translate produces good results only on fairly dry text and the moment there's some colloquialisms or figurative language involved it still breaks down very fast. Anything but the most badly written fiction is pretty much completely out, but also articles and interviews that are more than dry reports. I followed up on your example and tried transcribing and Google-translating several different types of content from the issue of Famitsu @kitsunebi77 posted the other day. These are carefully checked hand transcriptions and don't have the imperfections OCR inevitably produces. Since I know Japanese, I tried to predict how well Google will do as I was typing and I got it right every time. I'll go from best to worst. First, here's where Google did a fantastic job for the most part: a news article from the news section at the front of the magazine: This is pretty good! This news article is clearly written for kids with some small colloquial patterns thrown around, but for the most part it's just informative text. The only potential source of confusion is the word "in" in the first paragraph (Toy Show *is* Japan's largest toy trade fair, it doesn't take place *in* it). The very last paragraph got a little messy in translation (and got confused about how to transcribe SNK and Neo Geo) but is still readable. There's also some inconsistency with "provisional name" and "tentative name" for the same expression in different places (I prefer the latter). Next, a short game preview from the PlayStation launch lineup. I'm pretty sure this is marketing text that came directly from Sony and wasn't written by Famitsu's editors. Not bad at all. The biggest mistake is translating 広野 as the name Hirono instead of as the word "plains". "About 10 stages" is also a mistranslation (the original simply states there are 10 stages). But overall, it's clear and you get what the piece is trying to say. Now let's see how Google does with something that's not purely informational. Here's the very first review in the review section, for the game "Super 4WD, The Baja": This isn't good. Famitsu reviews have a very small character count to work with so they're usually written in colloquial shorthand style that Google trips over as often as it gets right. We get words left untranslated, and the penultimate sentence is one you might reason out the meaning of, but you might also not plus it turned "バイク野郎" into a simple"biker" which I can't forgive. There weren't any interviews in this issue of Famitsu so I turned to a random issue of PC Engine Fan of the same vintage and pulled out the first question of an interview with the director of Cosmic Fantasy 4: This is obviously messed up, but not in the way you'd expect if you can't read the original. A savvy researcher might think that the sentence starting with "So when" came out a little strange but conveys the original thought. It does not - it's a complete mistranslation in every possible way. Ochi's last sentence ("But this time I'm ready to die") is something I think a lot of people would assume Google messed up but is actually perfectly accurate. The note following it is an incomprehensible mess though. Finally, the Famitsu review section includes a short "about myself" blurb for each of the four reviewers. Since the reviewers repeated from issue to issue and the readers were expected to know their personalities, this was usually devoted to "random stuff I thought about this week" from the reviewer in question. This is as colloquial as any text in Famitsu gets. Here's the guy who wrote the review from above: To be honest, I don't understand most of the references here myself. But the one I do weren't translated correctly and the rest are so mangled that you couldn't research them if you wanted to. I can take the Japanese text and spend some time on Google and Wikipedia and eventually get every single thing said here, but Google's results are just garbage. I don't see any of the issues here solved anytime soon. And even for the texts where the results seem excellent, they're only good as starting points for any serious research and should be confirmed with a real speaker, because unexpected inaccuracies are still the norm.
  17. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! GamePro Issue 240 (September 2008) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: Melki    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  18. 1 point
    and Presents! Electronic Game Player Issue 3 (July-August 1988) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day Edited By: E-Day Uploaded By: E-Day Donated by: CouryC Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!
  19. 1 point
    Yeah, but let's be honest. 95% of the people (who aren't Japanese) who download Japanese mags from our site couldn't care less about things like interviews, because they don't speak Japanese. Like it or not, the only reason most people download our Japanese mags is for the pictures. The number of Japanese-literate foreigners is far too small to qualify as an intended audience for these scans. If that handful of people enjoy reading the interviews, that's great, but it isn't as if the scan being made available has suddenly made that information available to the English-speaking world. For all but a few, those brief summaries and anecdotes in English publications are still a more valuable source of info than an untranslated scan of a Japanese mag will ever be.
  20. 1 point
    Current number of issues of Famitsu: 1614 Total number of scans released by all members of Retromags since it launched 14 years ago: 1681 Best of luck to you, then.
  21. 1 point
    E-Day, I have been waiting since 1991 to finally read this issue !!thank you from the bottom of my heart for filling my childhood request !! I can die now .lol .I love this website !! I will always donate to keep it going
  22. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! Updated Release of GamePro Issue 102 (March 1997) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day Edited By: Melki Uploaded By: E-Day Donated By: CIVICMINDED
  23. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! GamePro Issue 239 (August 2008) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: Melki    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  24. 1 point
    Not being a NES/SNES gamer, you probably haven't perused too many of the magazines that covered them. If you did, it's pretty obvious they were not targeted at adults. For that matter, neither were the systems or games. While there were most definitely adults who played them as well, 8-bit and 16-bit systems and games were exclusively marketed towards kids and teens (in the USA, at any rate.) During those years, adults who played games did so on computers for the most part. The PlayStation era is when the age range began to skew older, although it was mostly due to a generation of Nintendo/Sega gamers who had come of age but were still interested in playing games. And as the age gap between console gamers and computer gamers began to disappear, so did the differences in the types of games which appeared on those platforms. Fast forward to today when there's virtually no difference between PC gaming and console gaming (again, in the USA.)
  25. 1 point
    I was not playing console games in the 1990s -- I essentially skipped from the 2600 to the PlayStation -- so I never paid any attention to the NES and SNES magazines. That said, does anyone have a sense of how well titles like this sold BITD? Personally, I would only have purchased an occasional issue if there was in-depth coverage of a game that I had (or that I planned to get). I simply could not justify buying it on a regular basis, much less subscribing. There would be many issues with no relevant content. Obviously, today with generally much larger collections, and emulation, the situation is much different.
  26. 1 point
    Thanks to the kitsunebi insights and some gimp trial and error (too cheap for photoshop and their creative cloud subscription nonsense) I managed to get a readable and nice looking of the 2 pages spread I had to cut I probably could have scanned a couple of Gamest issues instead of this whole editing madness luckily the Famitsu issue I scanned has only few of these fold out
  27. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! GamePro Issue 238 (July 2008) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: Melki    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  28. 1 point
    This guy popped up in my recommended feed the other day. Nice to see this series isn't dead.
  29. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! Game Player's Strategy Guide to Nintendo Games Volume 4 Number 6 (June 1991) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: E-Day    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  30. 1 point
  31. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! Electronic Gaming Monthly Issue 187 (January 2005) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: E-Day    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: Cryomancer Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  32. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! GamePro Issue 237 (June 2008) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: Melki    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  33. 1 point
    I brought this post directly to his attention because I 100% agree on this. Anyone who had a hand in getting a magazine released should be thanked.
  34. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! GamePro Issue 235 (April 2008) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: Melki    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  35. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! Game Player's Strategy Guide to Nintendo Games Volume 4 Number 5 (May 1991) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: E-Day    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  36. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! GamePro Issue 234 (March 2008) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: Melki    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  37. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! Game Player's Strategy Guide to Nintendo Games Volume 4 Number 4 (April 1991) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: E-Day    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  38. 1 point
    Retromags Presents! GamePro Issue 233 (February 2008) Database Record Download Directly! Scanned By: E-Day    Edited By: Melki    Uploaded By: E-Day    Donated By: CIVICMINDED Subscribe to our New Release Feedburner email!  
  39. 1 point
    PC Gamers from 2005 are new to be allowed here but who am I kidding, no one around here scans PC Gamer anyway. I actually stopped gaming for the most part prior to 2005, so I'm not gonna be much help, but maybe some of you youngsters out there who are familiar with these new-fangled MMO thingamajiggers (like, those of you who didn't have to google what a "raid" is) can help.
  40. 1 point
    Finding general interest magazines is hard. Since scanning a magazine is such a pain in the ass, typically only people with a passion for a specific hobby or subject are going to be willing to make the effort to do so. To that end it's probably simpler to find scans of model railroad magazines than of something like what you're looking for. Good luck!
  41. 1 point
    That's an interesting point of view. If you prefer the still-bound flatbed scanner look, you could take our releases and open them in Photoshop or some other editing software. Select about an inch-worth of space along the gutter side of the page. Then apply a strong blur filter to that section as well as a darkened gradient. Finally, use the warp command to distort it. Voila! Seriously, though, even though we would never allow that sort of thing here, there are plenty of people who can recognize that a low-quality scan is better than no scan at all, so uploading it to a file repository like archive.org isn't b-team at all (that would suggest that they are a team to begin with.) It's just a place where anyone can upload files without needing to worry about if the quality meets any kind of standards or if they have permission top upload the files in the first place. Like torrents. Without the torrents. It's where I upload things that I didn't scan myself. So by all means, scan your stuff in whatever way you're comfortable with and upload it there. I guarantee there will be people who appreciate it.
  42. 1 point
    You meant to say GameFan, but yeah. As for Retro Gamer, at this point, the way I see it, the majority of people still reading gaming mags are old timers who grew up reading them and still like holding something made of paper in their hands. Younger generations aren't buying gaming mags, and as people get older, some of them (like myself) stop caring about new systems and games - and thus stop being interested in reading new gaming mags as well - which is why their circulation numbers continue to dwindle. By that same logic, however, a print mag focused on retro gaming should have the most lasting appeal with older gamers who still read print mags, so who knows? Retro Gamer may well be the Last Mag Standing when all is said and done.
  43. 1 point
    Won the first issue of PSX Magazine!
  44. 1 point
    I disagree, but then I'm of the opinion that readable is just fine. And an unedited or roughly edited mag is still much more readable than a mag that hasn't been scanned at all. So that's where I choose to put my efforts. I can see the want for completion, but we're tens of thousands of scans away from ever getting there - it ain't gonna happen. So I'd rather scan something for the first time rather than make sure every magazine hosting site has an exclusive copy of the same magazine. Don't worry, I don't expect everyone to agree with me. Just stating my own philosophy on the matter.
  45. 1 point
    He's right to be scared too; Dave will come after whoever he can find, trust me on that one. Now, as to why he and Game Informer seem to throw fits over distributing old issues of magazines they themselves refuse to sell or make available, I don't know. Game Informer, I can live with out. It has always been, and will always be a magazine they gave away damn-near-free with purchases at FuncoLand. The first few years were alright, but like every other mag they just became a shill rag for Sony later on. Gamefan, on the other hand, was solid all the way through. Granted, we had to put up with Monkey Boy Rox and his blatant bashing of anything non-Sony, but the rest of the staff really seemed to give everyone else a solid shot. It was definitely the only place to find quality Sega coverage. Now, I have almost every issue of Gamefan, the actual mag, as I did EGM and GamePro, but I am tired of lugging around 80lb boxes of mags everywhere I move to, and it's nice to have my entire collection on a portable HDD or bits of it on tablets, phones, etc. Gamefan was the last holdout in terms of finding them digitially. I honestly don't care where Sketch "stole" them from, I am with Marktrade in that it's for the good of the community that they are now available.
  46. 1 point
    Well, listen man, I hate to do it to you..but it goes back to my whole "people have scans of Gamefan and are too scared to post them" thoughts from a while back. This guy wasn't scared to do it, and if he'd of contacted me, I'd of posted them for him. Hell, I am going to convert them to CBZ and add them to my Archive.org collection just to have a backup in case his stuff ever gets pulled. Now, for the other stuff, like Play or Gamers' Republic that you guys do scan and post, that he has managed to gank from this site, I can see and support what you're saying. A lot of them look like the "r"(I'm assuming it stands for "review") versions, which makes me wonder how he got a hold of all these in the first place. At any rate, I didn't mean to bring up a sore subject; I just saw and started downloading before running into issues where I could tell how/where he was acquiring them.
  47. 1 point
    A lot has been made of the internet's role in ending the gaming mag, but it definitely isn't the only factor - as you say, other mags continue to exist despite the internet. The real culprit is that American video game magazines were mostly devoid of any lasting valuable content. For example: My father has an interest in history, and used to subscribe to at least one magazine about the American Civil War. Obviously, there isn't going to be a lot of breaking news about such a topic, so it's true that the immediacy of the internet isn't going to be an advantage over a print mag. Nevertheless, there is plenty of information about the Civil War available online, all of it free. So why buy a magazine? The answer is that it is a collection of original, valuable content. Each issue was a collection of original researched articles, and so long as the information therein wasn't later contradicted or revised due to continuing archaeological or scholarly discovery, those articles remain sources of valuable information even today. Now look at your typical gaming mag. Chosen completely at random, I'll be examining EGM 102 from January 1998 (in other words, before magazine sales could have been adversely affected by the internet.) Out of 203 pages: 53% Advertisements - 109 pages of ads. Old ads can be of some interest to a retro site like this, but certainly no one bought the mag at the time it was published for the ads 12% previews - These have no lasting value, and honestly had very little value even at the time of publication. Most of the information is either heresay, based on unfinished builds, or else simply regurgitating whatever hype was printed on the press release. Even the screenshots printed were often those provided by the publisher and thus not even original to the mag they were printed in 12% feature articles - This is really what should be the main content of a successful mag 6% reviews - has some lasting value 5% strategy - could have lasting value if the strategy was in-depth or detailed maps were provided similar to a strategy guide. But in this case, "strategy" consists of tips and codes, all of which can much more easily be found online, making this the one section that is definitely made redundant by the internet. 3% news - had contemporary value, though the only value it holds now is to be amused by any news that turned out to be false 9% other (editorial, TOC, letters, next issue, etc.) So basically, with reviews and articles making up the only portions of the magazine worth keeping around long-term, there are 38 pages of valuable content to be found, which accounts for 19% of the magazine. The rest is essentially fluff.
  48. 0 points
  49. 0 points
    I don't know you have that one on file,that is very hard mag to do,great work however did this thanks again
  50. 0 points
    So after looking at "the new EGM" I kinda feel lied to. When I stated my specialty was in older games and the history of gaming, I was told that they really weren't looking for anyone or anything in that field. I go look at the revamped site today, and see a detailed analysis on "Sneak King" a game close to a decade old. I would have rather been told my writing needs more work or that there were other candidates in the area I specialized in they would prefer to work with than be told they aren't looking for someone in my field of expertise, than bring in someone working in my field of expertise at launch. Again, I am fine being passed by, as I am an amateur. But an honest reason would be a lot better than them doing the opposite mentioned to me. It left a bad taste in my mouth when I checked the site.