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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/22/2020 in Posts

  1. 1 point
    And one more for good measure. If you ever thought you needed a Dungeon Master manga in your life, this guide has you covered. https://archive.org/details/dungeonmasterchaosstrikesbackguidebookexpandededition
  2. 1 point
    This guide covers Dungeon Master: Chaos Strikes Back, which was marketed as an expansion for Dungeon Master since it reused the same engine, but it's really a full-fledged sequel. I'm not sure why they decided to call it an expansion, since owning the original is not required, and other series like Wizardry and Might and Magic had already established a precedent of releasing sequels which used the same engines as their predecessors. Maybe since it was designed to be much more difficult than the first game they were afraid it would be too much for Dungeon Master newbs who hadn't already cut their teeth on the first game, but that doesn't seem to be a wise decision from a marketing perspective... https://archive.org/details/dungeonmasterchaosstrikesbackperfectguide
  3. 1 point
    I grew up playing graphic adventures on the PC, so I never really got into Japanese-style adventure games, which are all first-person menu-driven affairs which for some reason are almost always some form of murder mystery story. The games usually revolve around picking the right dialog choice to progress the story, and everything must often be done in a strictly linear order, which just isn't meaty enough gameplay for my taste in adventure games. Still, they're quite popular (in Japan), and one of the longer-lasting series is that of Detective Saburo Jinguji, a series of around 45 games across various consoles and mobile devices which began in 1987 on the Famicom and continues to this day, the newest game having been released for the PS4 in 2019. This guide covers a 2005 Game Boy Advance entry in the series: Detective Saburo Jinguji: The Girl With the White Shadow. https://archive.org/details/tanteijinguujisaburoushiroikagenoshojoofficialinvestigationfile
  4. 1 point
    Moving away from computer games for a second, here's a guide to a console game - and you know what that means! Lots of pictures in full color! I've wondered why console game guidebooks are colorful and packed with artwork, but computer game guides are usually black and white with very little art, and I've come up with a few possibilities: Most console gamers were children. Color and pictures are necessary to appeal to that market. Meanwhile, most computer gamers were adults who would be more accepting of a drab presentation. But honestly, I think even adults would appreciate the pics and color... Consoles have always been big business in Japan, and computer games are more of a niche product. Thus there is less money to be made in computer game guides, and thus less money is spent on printing color pages with graphics. This is probably true, but probably not the only factor at work. Console games are usually very simplistic in gameplay, so very little needs to be said in text about strategies necessary to play them. Without all of the pictures, there wouldn't be enough text to fill a book. This is probably true to a degree. Does a fighting game really need a 150 page strategy guide, or would a few pages of move lists more or less cover all of the important information? Does a beat-em-up even need a strategy guide, when the only thing you do in the entire game is walk right and punch stuff? It's probably a combination of all three and some other reasons I haven't considered. But regardless of the reason, the bottom line is...hey look! A console game guide!! Pretty pictures!!! Grandread for the Sega Saturn (1997): https://archive.org/details/grandreadofficialguidebook
  5. 1 point
    Here's a guide to a JRPG you've probably never played. Burai was first released for Japanese computers in 1989, which is what this guide covers (it was later ported to the PC Engine, Super Famicom, and Sega CD). Lots of pics in this one (albeit b&w). https://archive.org/details/buraivol.1