Subcategories

  1. 16
    issues
  2. Appli Style

    アプリスタイル (Appli Style - "appli" is short for "application") covers mobile games. It was published irregularly from Vol.1 (Jan.2011) to Vol.11 (November 2012), after which it relaunched as a monthly publication (月刊アプリスタイル, or "Monthly Appli Style"), beginning with issue 1 in February 2013.
    104
    issues
  3. Arcadia

    Covers Japanese arcade games. Launched in 1999 with Vol.1-3 before relaunching as a monthly magazine with issue 1 in June 2000. It remained monthly until switching to bimonthly publication in June 2013, before finally being canceled in April 2015.
    171
    issues
  4. Asocom

    Asocom (アソコン) is a portmanteau of the words asobi (play) and computer. This magazine covered games for Japanese computers and was published by Tatsumi Publishing from 1985 to 1988.
    17
    issues
  5. Binetsu Ouji

    Binetsu ōji (微熱王子, lit. Slight Fever Prince) was a magazine aimed at girls which focused on BL (boy's love) games and was published by Studio DNA for 12 issues from 2002 to 2005. At this point, the magazine was taken over by Ohzora Publishing and relaunched as Cool-B.
    12
    issues
  6. BugBug

    BugBug was launched by Sun Publishing Group in 1992 as a general PC game magazine, but weak initial sales prompted them to switch their focus towards adult games beginning with the third issue, at which point sales began to steadily increase, and currently it remains one of the longest running game magazines still being published in Japan.
    332
    issues
  7. BugBug Kouryaku idoL

    Preceeded by Kouryaki Dennou idol, BugBug Kouryaku idoL (BugBug 攻略idoL) focuses on strategy and tips for adult games.
    23
    issues
  8. CapBon

    CapBon (カプ本) was a magazine published by Capcom, about Capcom, and featured not only articles on games and interviews with Capcom designers, but also manga sections with comics featuring Capcom characters. A total of 6 issues were published between 2011 and 2013.
    6
    issues
  9. Colorful Apex

    Colorful Apex was a magazine published by BiBLOS which covered adult bishoujo games for the PC. Only 3 issues were published before Colorful Apex was merged with another adult PC game magazine, Puregirl, creating a single magazine titled Colorful Puregirl.
    3
    issues
  10. Colorful Puregirl

    BiBLOS, who published the adult PC game magazine "Colorful APEX," took over the staff and trademark of "Puregirl" and merged these two magazines, resulting in the May 1999 inaugural issue of "Colorful PUREGIRL."
    76
    issues
  11. Comptiq

    Comptiq (コンプティーク) began publication in 1983, covering computer games and including sections of serialized manga, usually based on games. Adult games were often covered as well, though they were not the primary focus of the magazine. Over time, the magazine's content evolved to include coverage of bisoujo anime as well as games and manga, resulting in its current self-proclaimed status as a "media mix" magazine.
    405
    issues
  12. Continue

    "CONTINUE" was a game magazine published by Ota Publishing from 2001 to 2010. It was launched on March 15, 2001 and initially was a quarterly but from vol.8 (published February 15, 2003) it became bimonthly (published on even months). Its editorial policy was somewhat unique among other game magazines in that rather than focusing on fluff previews promoting upcoming games, it focused more on articles and columns relating to games and the gaming industry. Lengthy interviews with game industry officials and creators were a regular feature, and it often prominently featured positive articles on games from overseas, gaining particular notoriety by its extensive coverage of both GTAIII and Vice City (which received its "game of the year" award) before either game was even licensed to be released in Japan. This magazine is printed in A5 size
    59
    issues
  13. Cool-B

    Cool-B is a magazine aimed at girls that focuses on BL (boy's love) games and is published by Ohzora Publishing. It is a continuation of earlier magazine "Binetsu Ouji" from publisher Studio DNA and was relaunched as Cool-B beginning in May 2005.
    109
    issues
  14. DearMy...

    "DearMy..." was an all-ages bishoujo magazine published by Enterbrain in an attempt to appeal to a similar audience to those reading "Dengeki G's Magazine." A total of 18 issues were published.
    18
    issues
  15. Dengeki Dreamcast

    Dengeki Dreamcast (電撃Dreamcast) was published by MediaWorks for 45 issues from 1998-2000. It was preceded by Dengeki Sega Saturn.
    45
    issues
  16. Dengeki Gamecube

    Dengeki Gamecube (電撃Gamecube) began with the January 2002 issue and was a direct continuation of Dengeki GB Advance. Initially, editorial policy was to continue the tone of an all-ages mag, carried over from the Dengeki Nintendo 64 era. But beginning with the January 2004 issue, a decision was made to appeal to a younger audience, since that is Nintendo's largest demographic. To reflect this change, the title of the magazine was changed to デンゲキゲームキューブ, which is still "Dengeki Gamecube," but written all in katakana characters so as to be easier to read for its target audience of young children. The final issue was published in April 2006, at which point the title was changed to Dengeki Nintendo DS.
    52
    issues
  17. Dengeki Games

    "Dengeki Games" (電撃ゲームス) was a monthly multi-platform game magazine published by ASCII · Media Works. It ran for 21 issues from November 2009 to July 2011.
    21
    issues
  18. Dengeki Game Appli

    Dengeki Game Appli (電撃ゲームアプリ) was a magazine which focused exclusively on mobile games. 15 issues were published between January 2012 and May 2014.
    15
    issues
  19. Dengeki GB Advance

    Following its previous iteration as Dengeki Nintendo 64 (and Dengeki Super Famicom before that), Dengeki GB Advance (電撃GBアドバンス) was launched to coincide with the release of the Game Boy Advance and ran for 8 monthly issues from May 2001 to December 2001, at which point the title was changed to Dengeki Gamecube.
    8
    issues
  20. 14
    issues
  21. Dengeki G's Festival!

    This spin-off of Dengeki G's Magazine focuses on 1-2 titles per issue and usually includes some form of character goods packaged with the mag, resulting in widely varying price points (approximately $15-50 per issue, depending on what is bundled with the mag.)
    90
    issues
  22. 246
    issues
  23. 6
    issues
  24. Dengeki Nintendo 64

    Continuing from its previous iteration as Dengeki Super Nintendo, Dengeki Nintendo 64 ran for 59 monthly issues from June 1996 to April, 2001. Following this, the magazine's title was changed once again to Dengeki GB Advance.
    59
    issues
  25. Dengeki Nintendo DS

    Beginning with the May 2006 issue, "Dengeki Gamecube" was re-branded as "Dengeki Nintendo DS." It was published until April 2012, making it the longest-running iteration of MediaWorks' Dengeki Nintendo line of magazines to date, dating back to the Super Famicom era. Like "Dengeki Gamecube", "Dengeki Nintendo DS" is aimed at young children, and in May 2012, the magazine's title was changed to "Dengeki Nintendo for KIDS."
    72
    issues
  26. Dengeki Nintendo For Kids

    This magazine was previously known as "Dengeki Nintendo DS," and continues that title's editorial policy of targeting young children as their main readership. With the 3DS already on the market and the Wii U arriving shortly, the title was changed to "Dengeki Nintendo For Kids" beginning with the May 2012 issue. 13 issues were published under the "Dengeki Nintendo For Kids" title, and in June 2013 the title was changed again, this time simply to "Dengeki Nintendo," which took a more all-ages editorial stance.
    13
    issues
  27. 40
    issues
  28. 612
    issues
  29. Dengeki Sega EX

    "Dengeki Sega EX" ran for 12 monthly issues from August 1996 to July 1997. At this point it changed it's title to "Dengeki Sega Saturn" and switched to a bi-weekly publication schedule.
    12
    issues
  30. Dengeki Sega Saturn

    Continuing from its previous iteration as Dengeki Sega EX, Dengeki Sega Saturn ran for 31 issues from July 11, 1997 to November 27, 1998. Following this, the magazine's title was changed once again to Dengeki Dreamcast.
    31
    issues
  31. Dengeki Super Famicom

    Dengeki Super Famicom (電撃スーパーファミコン) first went on sale on December 26, 1992. When the Nintendo 64 was released in 1996, the magazine's name was altered to Dengeki Nintendo 64. This was again changed in 2001 when it was changed to Dengeki GB Advance to reflect the launch of the Game Boy Advance. In 2002, it was renamed to Dengeki GameCube and again to Dengeki Nintendo DS in April 2006. Starting with the May 2012 issue, the magazine was retitled to Dengeki Nintendo for Kids, and was renamed to its current title Dengeki Nintendo with the June 2013 issue.
    66
    issues
  32. Dreamcast Magazine (JP)

    Dreamcast Magazine is a direct continuation of Sega Saturn Magazine (also published by Softbank). For the purposes of our database, we will be treating the first issue under the title of "Dreamcast Magazine" as issue #1, although the official publication number is #234 (a numbering system which also includes Beep, Beep Megadrive, and Sega Saturn Magazine).
    114
    issues
  33. DVD BugBug

    This spinoff from BugBug is a DVD magazine focused on adult games and anime. The bulk of the content is contained on the included DVD, while the magazine itself is only around 50 pages on average.
    44
    issues
  34. 1,504
    issues
  35. Famitsu App

    Famitsu App (ファミ通App) is an offshoot of Weekly Famitsu which covers games released for mobile devices. It began by covering both iPhone and Android games simultaneously, but later split coverage of each platform into separate alternating issues. Since June 2015 it has covered Android releases exclusively.
    35
    issues
  36. 46
    issues
  37. Famitsu GREE

    Famitsu GREE (ファミ通GREE) was an offshoot of Weekly Famitsu which covered games released for GREE, a Japanese social networking service that focuses primarily on mobile games. It was published on an irregular basis and ran for 10 issues from October 2011 to August 2013.
    10
    issues
  38. Famitsu Mobage

    Famitsu Mobage (ファミ通mobage) was an offshoot of Weekly Famitsu which covered games released for Mobage. Mobage (pronounced "mobah-geh," short for "mobile game") is a portal and social network for games, owned by DeNA. The service has 30 million users, who largely play on mobile phones. Famitsu Mobage was published irregularly and ran for 17 issues from May 2011 to September 2013.
    17
    issues
  39. Game Enta! (Game Entertainment)

    Game Enta! (ゲームエンタ!) is technically a series of videogame-centered special edition issues of the magazine Nikkei Entertainment!, which is a general entertainment magazine that covers movies, music, books, games, radio, theater, the Internet, digital home appliances, etc. The covers proclaim that this is an "adult game magazine," by which they mean that unlike most gaming mags, it is aesthetically targeted at adult readers (it does not mean that it covers adult games, which it does not appear to do.) 11 issues were published between 2006 and 2011.
    11
    issues
  40. Gekkan PC Engine

    Gekkan PC Engine (月刊PCエンジン - lit. monthly PC Engine) was published by Shogakukan from 1988 to 1994.
    69
    issues
  41. Great Saturn Z

    Great Saturn Z (pronounced "zed," or in Japanese, "zetto") was a magazine focused on the Sega Saturn published by Mainichi Communications. It first appeared with a special "launch preparation issue" in May 1996, and then switched to a regular monthly magazine format with the July 1996 premier issue. It differentiated itself from the other Saturn magazines on the market (Sega Saturn Magazine, Saturn Fan, and Dengeki Saturn) by placing emphasis on editorial content and articles such as producer interviews and industry reports, rather than previews of the latest games that depended mostly on materials provided by the manufacturers. With the December 1998 issue, the title was changed to "Dreamcast Press" to reflect their shift of coverage to the newly launched Dreamcast.
    31
    issues
  42. Kouryaku Dennou idol

    Kouryaku Dennou idol (攻略電脳idol) is a special publication of BugBug magazine that focuses on strategy guides for adult games.
    29
    issues
  43. 67
    issues
  44. Oh! MZ

    "Oh! MZ" was published by Softbank and focused on Sharp's MZ line of computers (sold in Japan and Europe beginning in 1978). Though not a game magazine, most issues featured reviews/articles about games, and often featured game programs the user play by entering the lines of code into their computer themselves. Launched in June 1982, the magazine changed its name to "Oh! X" with the Nov/Dec 1987 issue due to the Sharp X1/x68000 computers supplanting the MZ series in popularity.
    66
    issues
  45. P-Mate

    P-Mate covers adult bishoujo games for the PC. After the initial 4 volumes, it was relaunched as a monthly magazine in October 1999 from Mainichi Communications (MYCOM) and ran until it's cancellation in December 2005.
    75
    issues
  46. Pasocom Paradise

    パソコンパラダイス (Pasocom Paradise) was Japan's first magazine to specialize in coverage of adult games for personal computers. It was launched in August 1991 as a bimonthly, switching to monthly publication in April 1993. The final issue was published in 2015.
    50
    issues
  47. PC Dolphin

    Covers adult bishoujo games for PCs. Following a short break after the initial 10 issues, the title was relaunched as PC Dolphin Digicom World which lasted an additional 4 issues.
    14
    issues
  48. Play Online

    Play Online covered computer games, with a particular focus on those that featured an online component. Unlike other Japanese magazines about computer games, Play Online primarily covered Western releases, and regularly included such things as coverage of overseas net games, developer interviews and hardware reviews, also uncommon in Japanese computer gaming mags.
    10
    issues
  49. PlayStation Magazine

    Published by Tokuma Shoten Intermedia, PlayStation Magazine was published from 1995 through 1999, ceasing publication just prior to the release of the PlayStation 2. It started on a monthly publication schedule but switched to bimonthly within its first year. Early issues were published in the traditional Japanese right-to-left style (meaning the spine was on the right side, and pages were turned from the left and read from right to left), but later it switched to the Western style used by most other magazines.
    73
    issues
  50. Puregirl

    Puregirl covers adult bishoujo games for the PC. It was launched with the April 1998 issue by published Japan Mix. As Japan Mix received notice of bankruptcy in December of that same year, the magazine was canceled with issue 10. BiBLOS, who published the Adult PC game magazine "Colorful APEX," took over the staff and trademark of Puregirl and merged the two magazines under the title "Colorful Puregirl" beginning in May 1999.
    10
    issues
  51. Raspberry

    Raspberry is a bishoujo game magazine published by Softbank. A total of 17 issues were published between July 2001 and June 2004. Initially launched as a special edition spinoff of the Dreamcast magazine "Dorimaga," the magazine covered Dreamcast bishoujo games to some degree but mostly focused on PC titles, especially towards the later years of the magazine's life as Dreamcast releases dwindled to a halt. Despite covering adult games, however, sexual imagery and screenshots were not shown.
    17
    issues
  52. 9
    issues
  53. 317
    issues
  54. The Super Famicom

    The Super Famicom (Theスーパーファミコン) was published biweekly by Softbank from 1990 to 1996 and was targeted at an older audience than Weekly Famitsu. With the launch of the N64, the magazine's title was changed to Super64.
    129
    issues